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Task Focusing Strategy During a Simulated Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01645566
First Posted: July 20, 2012
Last Update Posted: July 20, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Philipp Schuetz, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
  Purpose

This is a prospective randomized controlled study. The aim of this study is to

  1. describe the stress patterns experienced during a CPR situation;
  2. investigate whether the perceived stress was associated with CPR performance in terms of hands-on time and time to start CPR;
  3. to investigate whether this task focusing strategy reduces perceived stress levels, and
  4. whether this translates into better CPR performance. Based on findings that clear, directive leadership can enhance performance in cardiac resuscitation, we further 5) investigate if stress was associated with fewer leadership statements.

Condition Intervention
Mental Stress Behavioral: instruction

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Official Title: Impact of a Task Focusing Strategy on Perceived Stress Levels and Performance During a Simulated Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Philipp Schuetz, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • perceived levels of stress and feeling overwhelmed (stress/overload) [ Time Frame: time from start of CPR until scenario is finished (usually 5-10min) ]
    This is a simulator study and the study starts after students entered the simulator and the manikin has a cardiac arrest. The scenarios usually last for not more than 5-10 min at which time point the study is finished


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • hands-on time [ Time Frame: time from start of CPR until scenario is finished (usually 5-10min) ]
    This is a simulator study and the study starts after students entered the simulator and the manikin has a cardiac arrest. The scenarios usually last for not more than 5-10 min at which time point the study is finished

  • time to start CPR [ Time Frame: time from start of CPR until scenario is finished (usually 5-10min) ]
  • Number of leadership statements [ Time Frame: time from start of CPR until scenario is finished (usually 5-10min) ]

Enrollment: 124
Study Start Date: December 2007
Study Completion Date: July 2008
Primary Completion Date: May 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: intervention
instructions about focusing on relevant task elements by posing two task-focusing questions ("what is the patient's condition?", "what immediate action is needed?") when feeling overwhelmed by stress (intervention-group)
Behavioral: instruction
instructions about focusing on relevant task elements by posing two task-focusing questions ("what is the patient's condition?", "what immediate action is needed?") when feeling overwhelmed by stress (intervention-group)
No Intervention: Control
No instructions

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 4th year medical students

Exclusion Criteria:

  • No informed consent
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01645566


Locations
Switzerland
University Hospital Basel
Basel, BS, Switzerland, 4031
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sabina Hunziker, MD, MPH University Hospital Basel, Medical Intensive Care Unit
  More Information

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Philipp Schuetz, Dr., University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01645566     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BS1330978
First Submitted: July 15, 2012
First Posted: July 20, 2012
Last Update Posted: July 20, 2012
Last Verified: July 2012

Keywords provided by Philipp Schuetz, University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland:
cardiopulmonary resuscitation
stress
intervention

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stress, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms