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Eating Behaviors Among Weight-Discordant Siblings

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01598389
First Posted: May 15, 2012
Last Update Posted: May 15, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Tanja Kral, University of Pennsylvania
  Purpose
The purpose of this study was to compare weight-discordant siblings in eating in the absence of hunger, caloric compensation, and the quality of their habitual diet. The investigator hypothesized that, within families and controlling for age differences, overweight and obese siblings would show greater eating in the absence of hunger, poorer caloric compensation, and poorer diet quality (e.g., increased percent of energy from fat and caloric beverages) compared to normal-weight siblings.

Condition Intervention
Obesity Other: Feeding study

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Eating Behaviors Among Weight-Discordant Siblings

Further study details as provided by Tanja Kral, University of Pennsylvania:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Energy intake [ Time Frame: Up to 4 weeks ]
    %COMPX, EAH, dietary intake variables


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Body composition [ Time Frame: Single assessment at Week 4 ]
    Weight status (BMI-for-age percentile), BMI z-score, total body fat (%), waist circumference (cm), skinfold thickness (mm)


Enrollment: 94
Study Start Date: October 2008
Study Completion Date: May 2011
Primary Completion Date: May 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Low energy-dense preload Other: Feeding study
In a crossover design, siblings were served dinner once a week for 3 weeks. Across conditions, siblings were served the same dinner, but, 25 minutes before dinner, they either consumed in full or did not consume one of two preloads that varied in energy density. On the day when no preload was consumed, eating in the absence of hunger was assessed after dinner and defined as the number of calories consumed from snacks. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls.
Experimental: High energy-dense preload Other: Feeding study
In a crossover design, siblings were served dinner once a week for 3 weeks. Across conditions, siblings were served the same dinner, but, 25 minutes before dinner, they either consumed in full or did not consume one of two preloads that varied in energy density. On the day when no preload was consumed, eating in the absence of hunger was assessed after dinner and defined as the number of calories consumed from snacks. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls.
Experimental: No preload Other: Feeding study
In a crossover design, siblings were served dinner once a week for 3 weeks. Across conditions, siblings were served the same dinner, but, 25 minutes before dinner, they either consumed in full or did not consume one of two preloads that varied in energy density. On the day when no preload was consumed, eating in the absence of hunger was assessed after dinner and defined as the number of calories consumed from snacks. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls.

Detailed Description:
The study used a discordant sibling design to compare putative obesity-promoting eating traits among siblings, 5-12 years, who were raised in the same household, but were discordant for weight status (normal-weight: BMI-for-age between 5 and less than the 85th percentile; overweight/obese: BMI-for-age greater or equal to the 85th percentile). Forty-seven pairs of same-sex siblings (boys and girls) were recruited from the greater Philadelphia area to participate in a 4-week study during which their eating behaviors and body composition were assessed. The study tested the hypotheses that overweight/obese, compared to normal-weight, siblings exhibit 1) a weaker ability to compensate for calories, 2) a greater susceptibility towards eating in the absence of hunger, and 3) habitual dietary intakes that favor increased dietary energy density (kcal/g) and increased %energy derived from fat and caloric beverages. The use of a behavioral genetics design to study eating phenotypes among siblings is a unique approach to elucidate shared and non-shared environmental influences that can contribute to variations in weight status during childhood.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   5 Years to 12 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • same-sex;
  • weight discordant (normal-weight vs. overweight/obese);
  • meet age criteria;
  • like most foods that were served in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • serious medical conditions or medication use known to affect appetite, food intake and body weight;
  • developmental or psychiatric conditions;
  • food allergies or nutrient intolerances (including lactose intolerance).
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01598389


Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pennsylvania
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Tanja V.E. Kral, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Tanja Kral, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01598389     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: K01DK078601 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: May 8, 2012
First Posted: May 15, 2012
Last Update Posted: May 15, 2012
Last Verified: May 2012