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Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Pediatric Brain Tumor Research

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01556178
First Posted: March 16, 2012
Last Update Posted: February 5, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rishi Lulla, Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
  Purpose
In normal patients, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contain circulating cells and other molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. In patients with central nervous system (CNS) and other conditions, the levels of these molecules may be altered. In several other studies at our institution, the investigators are investigating such molecules in tumor specimens as well as the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of pediatric patients with CNS tumors. However, these levels are difficult to interpret without comparing them to levels in patients without CNS tumors. The investigators propose a study to collect small amounts of blood and cerebrospinal fluid from pediatric patients without CNS tumors who are undergoing a diagnostic or therapeutic neurosurgical procedure aimed at addressing altered CSF dynamics.

Condition
Hydrocephalus

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Collection of Blood and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Pediatric Brain Tumor Research

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Rishi Lulla, Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • levels of miRNAs in the blood and CSF [ Time Frame: 2 yrs ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Survivin and biologic markers levels in the CSF and blood [ Time Frame: 2 yrs ]

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA
whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid

Enrollment: 5
Study Start Date: July 2011
Study Completion Date: April 2012
Primary Completion Date: April 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Children without central nervous system tumors
Children without central nervous system tumors between the ages of 1 year and 21 years who are undergoing a neurosurgical procedure to address hydrocephalus

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   1 Year to 21 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
All children without central nervous system tumors between the ages of 1 year and 21 years who are undergoing a neurosurgical procedure to address hydrocephalus during which CSF will be obtained will be considered
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Children without central nervous system tumors who are undergoing a neurosurgical procedure to address hydrocephalus during which CSF will be obtained
  • Between the ages of 1 year and 21 years
  • Patients must be having blood draws, lumbar punctures or CSF sampling from Ommaya reservoirs or VPS as part of routine clinical care.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who do not require routine blood draws and/or CSF collection as part of their routine clinical care
  • Patients who are considered too ill to participate as determined by their treating physician
  • Patients with documented bacterial of viral infections of the CSF, brain parenchyma and/or neurosurgical devices and/or
  • Patients with suspected de-myelinating conditions
  • Patients who are pregnant or lactating.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01556178


Locations
United States, Illinois
Children's Memorial Hospital
Chicago, Illinois, United States, 60618
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Rishi Lulla, MD Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
  More Information

Publications:
Fernandez-L A, Northcott PA, Taylor MD, Kenney AM. Normal and oncogenic roles for microRNAs in the developing brain. Cell Cycle. 2009 Dec 15;8(24):4049-54. Epub 2009 Dec 5.
Mitchell PS, Parkin RK, Kroh EM, Fritz BR, Wyman SK, Pogosova-Agadjanyan EL, Peterson A, Noteboom J, O'Briant KC, Allen A, Lin DW, Urban N, Drescher CW, Knudsen BS, Stirewalt DL, Gentleman R, Vessella RL, Nelson PS, Martin DB, Tewari M. Circulating microRNAs as stable blood-based markers for cancer detection. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jul 29;105(30):10513-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0804549105. Epub 2008 Jul 28.
Taylor DD, Gercel-Taylor C. MicroRNA signatures of tumor-derived exosomes as diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer. Gynecol Oncol. 2008 Jul;110(1):13-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2008.04.033. Erratum in: Gynecol Oncol. 2010 Jan;116(1):153.
Lawrie CH, Gal S, Dunlop HM, Pushkaran B, Liggins AP, Pulford K, Banham AH, Pezzella F, Boultwood J, Wainscoat JS, Hatton CS, Harris AL. Detection of elevated levels of tumour-associated microRNAs in serum of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Br J Haematol. 2008 May;141(5):672-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2141.2008.07077.x. Epub 2008 Mar 3.
Huang Z, Huang D, Ni S, Peng Z, Sheng W, Du X. Plasma microRNAs are promising novel biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer. Int J Cancer. 2010 Jul 1;127(1):118-26. doi: 10.1002/ijc.25007.
Ng EK, Chong WW, Jin H, Lam EK, Shin VY, Yu J, Poon TC, Ng SS, Sung JJ. Differential expression of microRNAs in plasma of patients with colorectal cancer: a potential marker for colorectal cancer screening. Gut. 2009 Oct;58(10):1375-81. doi: 10.1136/gut.2008.167817. Epub 2009 Feb 6.
Heneghan HM, Miller N, Lowery AJ, Sweeney KJ, Kerin MJ. MicroRNAs as Novel Biomarkers for Breast Cancer. J Oncol. 2009;2009:950201. doi: 10.1155/2010/950201. Epub 2009 Jul 20.
Zhu W, Qin W, Atasoy U, Sauter ER. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer and healthy subjects. BMC Res Notes. 2009 May 19;2:89. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-2-89.
Chakravarti A, Noll E, Black PM, Finkelstein DF, Finkelstein DM, Dyson NJ, Loeffler JS. Quantitatively determined survivin expression levels are of prognostic value in human gliomas. J Clin Oncol. 2002 Feb 15;20(4):1063-8.
Fangusaro JR, Jiang Y, Holloway MP, Caldas H, Singh V, Boué DR, Hayes J, Altura RA. Survivin, Survivin-2B, and Survivin-deItaEx3 expression in medulloblastoma: biologic markers of tumour morphology and clinical outcome. Br J Cancer. 2005 Jan 31;92(2):359-65.
Ikeguchi M, Kaibara N. survivin messenger RNA expression is a good prognostic biomarker for oesophageal carcinoma. Br J Cancer. 2002 Oct 7;87(8):883-7.
Ikeguchi M, Ueda T, Sakatani T, Hirooka Y, Kaibara N. Expression of survivin messenger RNA correlates with poor prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Diagn Mol Pathol. 2002 Mar;11(1):33-40.
Monzó M, Rosell R, Felip E, Astudillo J, Sánchez JJ, Maestre J, Martín C, Font A, Barnadas A, Abad A. A novel anti-apoptosis gene: Re-expression of survivin messenger RNA as a prognosis marker in non-small-cell lung cancers. J Clin Oncol. 1999 Jul;17(7):2100-4.
Mori A, Wada H, Nishimura Y, Okamoto T, Takemoto Y, Kakishita E. Expression of the antiapoptosis gene survivin in human leukemia. Int J Hematol. 2002 Feb;75(2):161-5.
Sarela AI, Verbeke CS, Ramsdale J, Davies CL, Markham AF, Guillou PJ. Expression of survivin, a novel inhibitor of apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory protein, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Br J Cancer. 2002 Mar 18;86(6):886-92.
Takamizawa S, Scott D, Wen J, Grundy P, Bishop W, Kimura K, Sandler A. The survivin:fas ratio in pediatric renal tumors. J Pediatr Surg. 2001 Jan;36(1):37-42.
Adida C, Berrebi D, Peuchmaur M, Reyes-Mugica M, Altieri DC. Anti-apoptosis gene, survivin, and prognosis of neuroblastoma. Lancet. 1998 Mar 21;351(9106):882-3.
Islam A, Kageyama H, Takada N, Kawamoto T, Takayasu H, Isogai E, Ohira M, Hashizume K, Kobayashi H, Kaneko Y, Nakagawara A. High expression of Survivin, mapped to 17q25, is significantly associated with poor prognostic factors and promotes cell survival in human neuroblastoma. Oncogene. 2000 Feb 3;19(5):617-23.
Ito R, Asami S, Motohashi S, Ootsuka S, Yamaguchi Y, Chin M, Shichino H, Yoshida Y, Nemoto N, Mugishima H, Suzuki T. Significance of survivin mRNA expression in prognosis of neuroblastoma. Biol Pharm Bull. 2005 Apr;28(4):565-8.

Responsible Party: Rishi Lulla, Principal Investigator, Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01556178     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2011-14612
First Submitted: February 24, 2012
First Posted: March 16, 2012
Last Update Posted: February 5, 2016
Last Verified: February 2016

Keywords provided by Rishi Lulla, Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago:
Hydrocephalus
Survivin
miRNA

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Brain Neoplasms
Hydrocephalus
Central Nervous System Neoplasms
Nervous System Neoplasms
Neoplasms by Site
Neoplasms
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases


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