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Does Cryofixation of Skin Specimens Affect Quality of Subsequent Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded H and E Histology

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01540695
First Posted: February 29, 2012
Last Update Posted: October 13, 2014
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
  Purpose

This prospective study of 60 slides of basal and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin aims to determine whether:

  1. The process of cryofixation prior to generating formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) H&E sections alters the histology in skin tumor specimens.
  2. Which specific histologic parameters are altered between previously cryofixed versus routine FFPE sections. Histologic observations will be recorded by two dermatopathologists and two Mohs surgeons and statistically analyzed.

Condition
Basal Cell Carcinoma Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Does Cryofixation of Skin Specimens Affect Quality of Subsequent Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded H&E Histology

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Number of Adverse Events

Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: February 2012
Study Completion Date: January 2013
Primary Completion Date: January 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:
Generating formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained permanent sections from previously cryofixed tissue is a common practice used to confirm diagnosis of frozen section histology. In dermatology, this practice can be used to examine Mohs layers and its debulk as well as routine nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) biopsies after initial histologic diagnosis with frozen sections. Even though freezing tissue can introduce histologic artifacts, there have been no studies documenting whether this occurs specifically in cryofixed tissues that are subsequently thawed for permanent FFPE H&E histology. The purpose of our study is to determine whether the freeze-thaw process used to generate permanent sections after cryofixation introduces significantly detectable histologic differences compared to permanent sections that were not previously cryofixed. Thirty debulk specimens of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas will be prospectively collected. Each specimen will be split so that half is processed as cryofixed permanents and the other half as noncryofixed permanents. The investigator will show each slide in random order to a group of four blinded participants (two dermatopathologists and two Mohs surgeons). Each participant must first rate the overall quality of histology. Then, each participant will rate each slide on the quality of cellular morphology, nuclear morphology, color and contrast of stains, intactness of specimen, and other miscellaneous artifacts. These data will then be analyzed for statistical significance.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population
All patients will be recruited from the Mohs unit of the HUP Department of Dermatology
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adult patients (age 18 or over) with a biopsy proven routine basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin who are scheduled for treatment with the Mohs procedure by Dr. Christopher Miller at the University of Pennsylvania's Division of Dermatologic Surgery will be included. Both female and male patients will be included.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinomas of more complex histopathology will be excluded from the study. Complex histopathology of a tumor is defined as features with aggressive, moderately to poorly differentiated, or unusual histopathology.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01540695


Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
Abramsonc Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Christopher Miller, MD Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
  More Information

Responsible Party: Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01540695     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UPCC 25911
First Submitted: February 9, 2012
First Posted: February 29, 2012
Last Update Posted: October 13, 2014
Last Verified: October 2014

Keywords provided by Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania:
Any patient with a routine basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma
of the skin diagnosed on frozen histology during a Mohs procedure

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Carcinoma
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell
Carcinoma, Basal Cell
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial
Neoplasms by Histologic Type
Neoplasms
Neoplasms, Squamous Cell
Neoplasms, Basal Cell
Formaldehyde
Disinfectants
Anti-Infective Agents