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Safety Study to Assess Whether Proinsulin Peptide Injections Can Slow or Stop the Body Damaging Its Own Insulin-making Cells in the Pancreas in Patients Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes (MonoPepT1De)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01536431
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 22, 2012
Last Update Posted : July 28, 2015
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Diabetes Vaccine Development Centre
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Professor Colin Dayan, Cardiff University

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to address the safety issue of whether, in patients with newly−diagnosed diabetes who still make some insulin, proinsulin peptide therapy adversely affects the rate of damage to the insulin making cells.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Type 1 Diabetes Drug: Pro insulin peptide Drug: Saline Phase 1 Phase 2

Detailed Description:

Type 1 Diabetes (also known as insulin−dependent diabetes) is caused by destruction of the insulin producing cells (Beta Cells) in the pancreas. Our group is interested in how this destruction could be stopped or reversed, as this may lead to development of a new generation of diabetes treatments which can prevent or slow down the damage, reducing or possibly even removing there need for insulin injections.

In a previous study we examined the safety of our novel approach to this problem, proinsulin (PI) peptide immunotherapy, in longstanding diabetes patients (diagnosed more than 5 years before), and found it to be well tolerated and free of major hypersensitivity reactions. However, it remains theoretically possible that this form of immunotherapy could make the immune reaction to the insulin making cells worse rather than better.

This cannot be studied directly in longstanding patients as they have no or almost no insulin making cells left.

So,the principle objective of the current study is to address the safety issue of whether, in patients with newly−diagnosed diabetes who still make some insulin, proinsulin peptide therapy adversely affects the rate of damage to the insulin making cells.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 27 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Phase 1b Study of Proinsulin (PI) Peptide Immunotherapy in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes
Study Start Date : January 2012
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Diabetes Type 1

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Pro insulin peptide
Patients will receive 10 micro gr of the peptide every 2 weeks (12 doses).
Drug: Pro insulin peptide
Patients will receive 10 micro gr of the peptide every 2 weeks (12 doses).

Active Comparator: Pro insulin peptide & saline
Patients will receive 10 micro gr of the peptide monthly (ever 4 weeks, 6 doses) and saline injections monthly alternating with the peptide (2 weeks interval between the drug and saline).
Drug: Pro insulin peptide
Patients will receive 10 micro gr of the peptide monthly (ever 4 weeks, 6 doses) and saline injections monthly alternating with the peptide (2 weeks interval between the drug and saline).

Placebo Comparator: Saline
Patients will receive 0 micro gr of peptide, but have saline injections every 2 weeks (controls)
Drug: Saline
Patients will receive 0 micro gr of peptide, but have saline injections every 2 weeks (controls).




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Safety [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    To address the safety issue of whether, in patients with newly−diagnosed diabetes who still make some insulin, proinsulin peptide therapy adversely affects the rate of damage to the insulin making cells.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Allergy and hypersensitivity [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    To confirm that PI peptide treatment does not induce allergy or hypersensitivity and has a good safety profile in new−onset type 1 diabetes patients.

  2. Safety of frequent dosing [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    To explore the safety of extending peptide treatment to more frequent dosing (2−weekly) and for a longer time period (6 months)

  3. Protective effects of insulin preservation [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    To provide preliminary data on any protective effect on preservation of insulin production after 1 year of treatment

  4. T cell (immune) response to islet cell antigens [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    To provide preliminary data on changes in the T cell (immune) response to islet cell antigens in newly−diagnosed patients following PI peptide treatment.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Age 18-40 years.
  2. If female, must be (as documented in patient notes):

    • postmenopausal (at least 1 year without spontaneous menses)
    • surgically sterile (tubal ligation or hysterectomy at least 6 months prior to enrolment)
    • using acceptable contraception (e.g., oral, intramuscular, or implanted hormonal contraception) at least 3 months prior to enrolment
    • have a sexual partner with non-reversed vasectomy (with confirmed azoospermia)
    • be using 1 barrier method with the use of a spermicide(e.g., condom, diaphragm or cap)
    • have placement of a intra-uterine device
  3. If male, must be:

    • using a barrier method of contraception (condom) with the use of a spermicide
    • have a sexual partner using one of the methods in point 2 above or
    • have a non-reversed vasectomy (with confirmed azoospermia),
  4. Diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes within the last 100 days (dated from the first insulin injection).
  5. Possession of *0401 allele at the HLA-DRB1 gene locus
  6. At least one positive islet cell autoantibody (ie anti-GAD65, antibodies to insulinoma-associated antigen-2 (IA-2) or zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8)).
  7. Peak insulin C-peptide >200 pmol/L (at any time point after stimulation with Mixed Meal Tolerance Test).
  8. Written and witnessed informed consent to participate.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Females who are pregnant, breast-feeding or not using adequate forms of contraception.
  2. Use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapies, including systemic steroids within 1 month prior to randomisation and any monoclonal antibody therapy given for any indication.
  3. Any other medical condition which, in the opinion of investigators, could affect the safety of the subject's participation.
  4. Recent subject's involvement in other research studies which, in the opinion of investigators, may adversely affect the safety of the subjects or the results of the study.
  5. Subjects should not have had immunisations with live or killed vaccines or allergic desensitisation procedures less than 1 month prior to their first treatment.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01536431


Locations
United Kingdom
Countess of Chester
Chester, England, United Kingdom, CH2 1UL
Bristol Royal Infirmary
Bristol, United Kingdom
University Hospital of Wales
Cardiff, United Kingdom
Guy's Hospital
London, United Kingdom
Royal Victoria Hospital
Newcastle, United Kingdom
Sponsors and Collaborators
Cardiff University
Diabetes Vaccine Development Centre
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Investigators
Study Director: Mark Peakman, MBBS BSc MSc PhD FRCP King's College Hospital NHS Trust

Responsible Party: Professor Colin Dayan, Professor, Cardiff University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01536431     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SPON817-10
2007-003759-35 ( EudraCT Number )
66760879 ( Registry Identifier: ISRCTN )
First Posted: February 22, 2012    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 28, 2015
Last Verified: July 2015

Keywords provided by Professor Colin Dayan, Cardiff University:
Diabetes

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Insulin, Globin Zinc
Insulin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs