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Breathing-swallowing Interaction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients - Impact of Non Invasive Ventilation

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01518075
First Posted: January 25, 2012
Last Update Posted: September 17, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital, Caen
  Purpose

In the investigators' knowledge there are no data about the impact of non invasive mechanical ventilation on the breathing-swallowing interaction.

Our main objective is to evaluate breathing-swallowing interaction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients hospitalized in intensive care unit for an acute exacerbation, and evaluate the impact of using non invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV)


Condition Intervention
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Decompensated COPD With (Acute) Exacerbation Other: Spontaneous Breathing Other: Non Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Breathing-swallowing Interaction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients Hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit for an Acute Exacerbation: Impact of Non Invasive Ventilation. Physiological Evaluation

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University Hospital, Caen:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Impact of non invasive mechanical ventilation on breathing swallowing interaction [ Time Frame: 2 h ]
    Physiological evaluation of breathing - swallowing interaction with or without non invasive mechanical ventilation


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Correlation between breathing swallowing interaction and functional respiratory parameters [ Time Frame: 24 h ]

Enrollment: 16
Study Start Date: January 2012
Study Completion Date: August 2012
Primary Completion Date: August 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Non invasive mechanical ventilation
Evaluation of breathing swallowing interaction under non invasive mechanical ventilation
Other: Non Invasive Mechanical Ventilation
Evaluation of breathing - swallowing interaction with non invasive mechanical ventilation. Patient breath under non invasive mechanical ventilation. Measurements of respiratory and swallowing parameters were monitored using respiratory inductive plethysmography. Swallowing was monitored noninvasively. Two bolus sizes were used, (5, 10 ml), in random order. Five sets of two boluses were studied, taking care not to use the same bolus size twice consecutively. The study participants were blinded to bolus size.
Other Name: NIV
Active Comparator: Spontaneous Breathing
Evaluation of breathing swallowing interaction without non invasive mechanical ventilation
Other: Spontaneous Breathing

Evaluation of breathing - swallowing interaction without non invasive mechanical ventilation. Patient breath spontaneously.

Measurements of respiratory and swallowing parameters were monitored using respiratory inductive plethysmography. Swallowing was monitored noninvasively. Two bolus sizes were used, (5, 10 ml), in random order. Five sets of two boluses were studied, taking care not to use the same bolus size twice consecutively. The study participants were blinded to bolus size.

Other Name: SB

Detailed Description:

In healthy subjects previous studies showed that most swallows started during expiration and were followed by expiration, a pattern believed to contribute to airway protection during swallowing. However In healthy individuals, the occurrence of inspiration after swallows was increased by hypercapnia or application of an inspiratory elastic load.

In a previous study the investigators have demonstrated that patients with neuromuscular disorders exhibited piecemeal deglutition leading to an increase in the time needed to swallow a water bolus, as well as occurrence of inspiration after nearly half the swallows. These abnormalities which increased with the decreasing of respiratory muscle performances may explain feeding difficulties. However in tracheostomized patients who could breathe spontaneously, piecemeal deglutition and swallowing time per bolus were diminished by the use of mechanical ventilation.

In the investigators' knowledge there are no data about the impact of non invasive mechanical ventilation on the breathing-swallowing interaction.

The investigators' main objective is to evaluate breathing-swallowing interaction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients hospitalized in intensive care unit for an acute exacerbation, and evaluate the impact of using non invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV)

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
  • Age > 18 years
  • Hospitalized in Intensive care for an acute exacerbation
  • Requiring Non invasive mechanical ventilation
  • Able to breath spontaneously without non invasive ventilation more than 4h/day
  • Without bulbar dysfunction

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Hemodynamic instability
  • Absence of consent
  • Severe Hypoxemia
  • pH < 7,30
  • No cooperation of the patient
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01518075


Locations
France
University Hospital, Caen
Caen, France, 14000
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Caen
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Nicolas TERZI, MD - PhD University Hospital, Caen
Principal Investigator: Frédéric Lofaso, MD-PhD University Hospital, Garches
  More Information

Responsible Party: University Hospital, Caen
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01518075     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DEGLUT
First Submitted: January 21, 2012
First Posted: January 25, 2012
Last Update Posted: September 17, 2012
Last Verified: September 2012

Keywords provided by University Hospital, Caen:
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Non invasive mechanical ventilation
Breathing-swallowing interaction
Intensive Care Unit

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Respiratory Aspiration
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiration Disorders
Pathologic Processes