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You Are What You Eat: A Randomised Controlled Trial of an Appearance-based Dietary Intervention

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01511484
First Posted: January 18, 2012
Last Update Posted: January 18, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
Unilever R&D
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
David Perrett, University of St Andrews
  Purpose
This study investigated whether illustration of the facial appearance benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption is able to motivate increased intake of this food group. The investigators hypothesize that individuals witnessing illustrations of the impact of a healthy diet will exhibit improvements in diet relative to a control group receiving only information on the health-benefits of this food group.

Condition Intervention
Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Behavioral: Information-only Behavioral: Generic appearance intervention Behavioral: Personalised appearance intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention

Further study details as provided by David Perrett, University of St Andrews:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Fruit and vegetable consumption [ Time Frame: up to 10 weeks ]
    Participants completed a computerised food frequency questionnaire to establish fruit and vegetable consumption. Participants were asked to retrospectively report consumption frequency of fruit juice, fruit, vegetable juice, salad, vegetable soup and vegetable items over the past seven days. Participants reported consumption of standard portion sizes and were provided with NHS illustrations of portion size guidelines to assist estimations.


Enrollment: 73
Study Start Date: February 2011
Study Completion Date: June 2011
Primary Completion Date: June 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Information-only
Selected pages from the British National Health Service (NHS) information booklets ["5 A Day, Just Eat More (fruit & veg)"; pages i, ii, 12-15, 20 & 21] and ["5 A Day, Just Eat More (fruit & veg): What's it all about?"; pages i-ii)] were provided to all participants on completion of baseline questionnaires. The pages provided information on recommended portion sizes, meal planning, health benefits and answered frequently asked diet-related questions
Behavioral: Information-only
Selected pages from the British National Health Service (NHS) information booklets ["5 A Day, Just Eat More (fruit & veg)"; pages i, ii, 12-15, 20 & 21] and ["5 A Day, Just Eat More (fruit & veg): What's it all about?"; pages i-ii)] were provided to all participants on completion of baseline questionnaires. The pages provided information on recommended portion sizes, meal planning, health benefits and answered frequently asked diet-related questions
Experimental: Generic-appearance intervention

Participants in the generic appearance intervention group received images to illustrate the impact of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin appearance. Participants in this group were presented with gender congruent stimuli, constructed by averaging the facial shape and colour of four male/female faces.

Participants viewed the gender-congruent set of the resulting stimuli in two forms. Firstly, after completion of baseline questionnaires, images were displayed on a computer monitor. Participants were instructed to select what they perceived as the healthiest face colour, which was recorded by the computer program over two trials.

Participants in this group also received a take-home photo quality leaflet to further illustrate the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin colour.

Behavioral: Generic appearance intervention

Participants in the generic appearance intervention group received images to illustrate the impact of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin appearance. Participants in this group were presented with gender congruent stimuli, constructed by averaging the facial shape and colour of four male/female faces.

Participants viewed the gender-congruent set of the resulting stimuli in two forms. Firstly, after completion of baseline questionnaires, images were displayed on a computer monitor. Participants were instructed to select what they perceived as the healthiest face colour, which was recorded by the computer program over two trials.

Participants in this group also received a take-home photo quality leaflet to further illustrate the effect of fruit and vegetable consumption on skin colour.

Experimental: Personalised appearance intervention
Participants in this group received stimuli manipulated in identical ways to that received by the generic appearance-intervention group, except the illustrations were performed upon images of the participant's own face.
Behavioral: Personalised appearance intervention
Participants in this group received stimuli manipulated in identical ways to that received by the generic appearance-intervention group, except the illustrations were performed upon images of the participant's own face.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 61 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Student or staff member at University of St Andrews
  • Has access to email account to receive link to weekly online questionnaire.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Exited study before completion
  • Unable to make dietary changes due to a medical condition
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01511484


Locations
United Kingdom
Perception Lab, School of Psychology, University of St Andrews
St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom, KY16 9JP
Sponsors and Collaborators
Perception Lab
Unilever R&D
Investigators
Study Director: Ross D Whitehead, MSc University of St Andrews
  More Information

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: David Perrett, Principal Investigator, University of St Andrews
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01511484     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: PerceptionLab001
First Submitted: December 23, 2011
First Posted: January 18, 2012
Last Update Posted: January 18, 2012
Last Verified: January 2012

Keywords provided by David Perrett, University of St Andrews:
fruit
vegetables
appearance
skin color
carotenoids
diet