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Rehabilitation of Everyday Memory Impairment in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study (REMI-PD)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01469741
First Posted: November 10, 2011
Last Update Posted: June 3, 2015
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Erin Foster, Washington University School of Medicine
  Purpose
Cognitive impairment is common among non-demented individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) and is a significant source of disability and reduced quality of life. Unfortunately, there are no successful interventions to address these impairments. Prospective memory impairment is a particularly functionally- and clinically-relevant problem in PD. The investigator's project will determine if a targeted intervention strategy improves PD participants' prospective memory. The investigator's goal is to improve PD patients' everyday prospective memory so they can successfully perform desired activities and roles.

Condition Intervention
Parkinson's Disease Behavioral: Prospective Memory Strategy

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Rehabilitation of Everyday Memory Impairment in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Erin Foster, Washington University School of Medicine:

Enrollment: 74
Study Start Date: June 2011
Study Completion Date: May 2014
Primary Completion Date: May 2014 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Behavioral: Prospective Memory Strategy
    Prospective memory is central to performance in everyday life as it serves to bind together goal-directed actions and enables people to carry out their plans and wishes meaningfully and appropriately. Everyday prospective memory tasks include remembering to run errands, keep appointments, and turn off the stove after using it.
Detailed Description:
Cognitive impairment is common among non-demented individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) and is a significant source of disability and reduced quality of life. Unfortunately, there are no successful interventions to address these impairments. Prospective memory impairment is a particularly functionally- and clinically-relevant problem in PD. The investigator's project will determine if a targeted intervention strategy improves PD participants' prospective memory. The investigator will use a randomized controlled design and a laboratory-based assessment of prospective memory to test the effect of the strategy in a controlled environment. The investigator will also see if PD participants, with support from an occupational therapist (OT), can generalize the strategy to their complex, real-world environments and tasks. Our goal is to improve PD patients' everyday prospective memory so they can successfully perform desired activities and roles.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   50 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants will be males and females over age 50 who meet criteria for idiopathic typical PD, are Hoehn & Yahr39 stage I-III (mild-moderate disease) and are treated with levodopa/carbidopa.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Possible dementia,
  • treatment with certain medications that interfere with cognition (e.g., anticholinergics),
  • change in medications over the study period, other neurological disorders, brain surgery (e.g., STN DBS),
  • history of psychotic disorder or significant current psychiatric disorder, or any condition that would interfere with testing (e.g., vision problems).
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01469741


Locations
United States, Missouri
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Missouri, United States, 63110
Sponsors and Collaborators
Washington University School of Medicine
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Erin Foster, OTD, OTR/L Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Occupational Therapy
  More Information

Responsible Party: Erin Foster, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Neurology and Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01469741     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 201103176
First Submitted: November 8, 2011
First Posted: November 10, 2011
Last Update Posted: June 3, 2015
Last Verified: June 2015

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Parkinson Disease
Parkinsonian Disorders
Basal Ganglia Diseases
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Movement Disorders
Neurodegenerative Diseases