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Strength Training Induced Alterations in Markers of Immune Function

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01450852
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 12, 2011
Last Update Posted : October 12, 2011
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

Study Description
Brief Summary:

Exercise has been used to help prevent or slow the progression of inflammation-related disease; however, the mechanism by which this activity may lower concentrations of inflammatory markers remains unclear. The melanocortin receptors 1,3 and 5 (MC1R, MC3R and MC5R) have been shown to function in an anti-inflammatory manner and have the potential to mediate the positive immune adaptations associated with regular physical activity.

Preliminary data suggest that MC3R gene expression increases in whole blood after chronic exercise training. The primary aim of the current study is to explore whether this change in gene expression translates into alterations in MC1R, MC3R, or MC5R monocyte surface expression. The secondary aim is to examine the relationship between surface expression of these receptors and circulating inflammatory profiles.

The investigators will recruit 42 untrained, healthy males and females aged 18-35 yrs. Half of the group will be placed on an exercise program for 15 weeks. The other half will serve as untrained control subjects. In addition to basic anthropometric measures, the investigators will measure concentrations of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines (ELISA) and cell surface expression of MC1R, MC3R, and MC5R on monocytes (flow cytometry).


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Inflammation Behavioral: Strength Training

Detailed Description:

Abstract:

Chronic exercise reduces inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. Recent studies have shown that stimulation of melanocortin 1 and 3 receptors (MC1R and MC3R) on immune cells increases anti-inflammatory cytokine production. PURPOSE: To examine the influence of 12 weeks of resistance training (RT) on body composition, monocyte cell-surface expression of MC1R and MC3R and circulating markers of inflammation. METHODS: Healthy, active males and females (age 20-27 yr) were recruited into a RT group (RE; n = 23) and an active control group (AC; n = 19). RE completed 12 weeks of progressive, periodized RT 3d/wk while AC maintained normal activity habits. Measures of body composition (DXA) were taken and blood was collected prior to (PRE) and following the intervention period (POST). Blood samples were analyzed for monocyte cell-surface expression MC1R, MC3R, MC5R and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the plasma cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) using flow cytometry and ELISAs respectively.


Study Design

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 42 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Strength Training Induced Alterations in Markers of Immune Function
Study Start Date : January 2010
Primary Completion Date : May 2010
Study Completion Date : May 2010
Arms and Interventions

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Strength Training
The strength training group completed 12 weeks of progressive, periodized resistance training 3d/wk.
Behavioral: Strength Training
Each Member of this group completed 12 weeks of progressive, periodized resistance training for 3d/wk.
No Intervention: Active Control Group
The active control group was instructed to maintain normal activity and eating habits. They participated in all pre and post intervention measures.


Outcome Measures

Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Melanocortin 1 Receptor Expression on Monocytes [ Time Frame: Before and After 12 Week of Intervention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for monocyte cell-surface expression of the melanocortin 1 receptor using flow cytometry. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.

  2. Plasma CRP [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intervention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for C-reactive protein using ELISA. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.

  3. Body Composition (Fat Tissue Amount) [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intervention Period ]
    Body composition was assessed using DXA. Pre measures were completed in Jan. 2010 and post measures were completed in May 2010 for all subjects.

  4. Plasma IL-6 [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intervention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for IL-6 using ELISA. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.

  5. Plasma IL-10 [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intervention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for IL-10 using ELISA. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.

  6. Melanocortin 3 Receptor Cell Surface Expression on Monocytes [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intervention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for monocyte cell-surface expression of the melanocortin 3 receptor using flow cytometry. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.

  7. Melanocortin 5 Receptor Cell Surface Expression on Monocytes [ Time Frame: Before and After the 12 Week Intevention Period ]
    Blood samples were analyzed for monocyte cell-surface expression of the melanocortin 5 receptor using flow cytometry. Pre samples were collected in Jan. 2010 and post samples were collected in May 2010 from all subjects.


Eligibility Criteria

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All Participants Must be Healthy
  • The Strength Training Group Members Must Be Approved For Participation by a Licensed MD

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Females may not be pregnant
  • Unhealthy participants (those with existing conditions)
Contacts and Locations

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01450852


Locations
United States, Louisiana
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States, 70803
Sponsors and Collaborators
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Laura K Stewart, PhD Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans
More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Laura Stewart, Assistant Professor, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01450852     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: LSU-IRB # 3005
First Posted: October 12, 2011    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 12, 2011
Last Verified: October 2011

Keywords provided by Laura Stewart, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans:
Melanocortin Receptor
Monocyte
Resistance Training
Inflammation
Markers of Inflammation

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Inflammation
Pathologic Processes