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Iron Metabolism in Small Pre Term Newborns

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified August 2017 by Dr Koren Ariel, HaEmek Medical Center, Israel
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01443195
First Posted: September 29, 2011
Last Update Posted: August 9, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr Koren Ariel, HaEmek Medical Center, Israel
  Purpose

Iron is an essential micronutrient that plays an important role in cellular functions of all microorganisms. Both iron deficiency and iron excess during the early weeks of life can have severe effects on neurodevelopment that may persist into adulthood and may not be corrected by restoration of normal iron levels.

Iron overload remains a significant concern in preterm infants because they have low levels of iron-binding proteins and immature antioxidant systems.

The aim of the study is to evaluate if iron supplementation is required/necessary in VLBW Very Low Birth Weight (less than 1500 grams) and to assess the efficacy and safety of the iron supplementation practice for VLBW preterm infants as implemented in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the Ha'Emek Medical Center, Afula, Israel.


Condition Intervention
Preterm Iron Metabolism Iron Overload Drug: Iron preparation

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Iron Metabolism in Small Pre Term Newborns

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Dr Koren Ariel, HaEmek Medical Center, Israel:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Assessment of iron status in preterm infants and identify which preterm infants are at risk for iron deficiency or iron overload. [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Assessment of the iron status in preterm infants and correlated them with clinical parameters: the blood transfusions given and the amount of blood obtained for routine laboratory analysis, and amount of daily iron intake through diet (human milk or formula)and identify which preterm infants are at risk for iron deficiency or iron overload.


Estimated Enrollment: 50
Study Start Date: October 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 31, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 31, 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Iron suplementation
Iron supplementation with IPC in a dose of 4 mg/kg/day of elemental iron started not before 4 weeks of age and as soon as 120 ml/kg/day of enteral feedings is tolerated given together with the first morning meal
Drug: Iron preparation

Iron supplementation with IPC in a dose of 4 mg/kg/day of elemental iron started not before 4 weeks of age and as soon as 120 ml/kg/day of enteral feedings is tolerated given together with the first morning meal. Serum samples will be obtained at 3 different times:

  1. Before starting iron supplementation (maximum one week before).
  2. At the beginning of iron supplementation in order to assess early signs of erythropoiesis, iron overload or free iron (day 4 - 7 days of supplementation).
  3. Before discharge from hospitalization in order to asses the iron metabolism and sings of iron deficiency (At least more than 2 weeks of supplementation).

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 6 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Very Low Birth Weight and / or borne at 30 weeks or less of gestational age that are scheduled to receive enteral iron supplementation as part of the standard protocol currently used by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
  • Birth weight will be not an inclusion or exclusion criteria for preterms born at 30 weeks or less.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Major physical anomalies,
  • renal or cardiac diseases,
  • newborns that underwent major surgery during the study period,
  • acute or chronic fetal blood loss,
  • hemolytic anemia,
  • refusal to receive parental consent.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01443195


Contacts
Contact: Ariel Koren, MD 972-4-6495576 ext 5576 koren_a@clalit.org.il

Locations
Israel
Pediatric Hematology Unit and Pediatric Dpt B - HaEmek Medical Center Recruiting
Afula, Israel, 18101
Contact: Ariel Koren, MD    972-4-6495576 ext 5576    koren_a@clalit.org.il   
Sub-Investigator: Ariel Koren, MD         
Principal Investigator: Carina Levin, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
HaEmek Medical Center, Israel
  More Information

Responsible Party: Dr Koren Ariel, Head of Pediatric Dpt B and Pediatric Hematology Unit, HaEmek Medical Center, Israel
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443195     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0035-11-EMC
First Submitted: September 27, 2011
First Posted: September 29, 2011
Last Update Posted: August 9, 2017
Last Verified: August 2017

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Iron Overload
Iron Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Iron
Trace Elements
Micronutrients
Growth Substances
Physiological Effects of Drugs