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The Effect of Variety on Physical Activity

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Hollie Raynor, University of Tennessee
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01441544
First received: September 25, 2011
Last updated: July 14, 2017
Last verified: July 2017
  Purpose

Increasing physical activity continues to be a challenge among many individuals, particularly those who are overweight. Recent data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that individuals who reported engaging in a variety of activities were more likely to meet national physical activity recommendations compared to those who reported no variety. Incorporating a variety of activities into a physical activity program may be a way to increase physical increase physical activity levels.

One method to increase variety in physical activities is to use active videogames. Videogames that use motion sensors allow a gamer to physically perform a variety of activities. Thus, the purpose ot this laboratory-based investigation is to conduct a study to examine the effect of engaging in a greater variety of active videogames on energy expenditure in 30 non-obese, regularly active adults.


Condition Intervention
Overweight Behavioral: Variety of Active Videogames

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: The Effect of Variety on Physical Activity

Further study details as provided by Hollie Raynor, University of Tennessee:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Energy expenditure in a laboratory session when active videogames are played [ Time Frame: End of each session ]

Enrollment: 32
Actual Study Start Date: September 2011
Study Completion Date: April 2016
Primary Completion Date: April 2016 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: VAREITY Behavioral: Variety of Active Videogames
Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY (playing the same active video game over 4 sessions) and NON-VARIETY (playing 4 different active video games over 4 sessions), with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants.
Experimental: NON-VARIETY Behavioral: Variety of Active Videogames
Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY (playing the same active video game over 4 sessions) and NON-VARIETY (playing 4 different active video games over 4 sessions), with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants.

Detailed Description:
Thirty men and women, aged 18- to 35- years, recruited from the local area, with a normal body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m, will participate in two experimental sessions, VARIETY and NON-VARIETY, with order of experimental sessions counterbalanced across participants. Participants will be assessed on liking of the active videogames, energy, tiredness, motivation, to succeed, interest in the games, and energy expenditure during the experimental sessions.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men and women, ages 18-25 years are eligible to participate. They will be recruited from flyers posted around campus and in local gyms, and must be willing to participate. They must have a body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 29.9 kg/m2.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants who have never played an active videogame or are unable to play an active videogame. If the participant dislikes (scoring <50 on a 100 mm visual analogue scale [VAS]) playing the active videogames used in the investigation. Or if the participant engages in less than 150 minutes/week of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity over the previous month.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01441544

Locations
United States, Tennessee
University of Tennessee
Knoxville, Tennessee, United States, 37996
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Tennessee
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Hollie A Raynor, Ph. D University of Tennessee
Principal Investigator: Dale Bond, PhD The Miriam Hospital
  More Information

Publications:

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Hollie Raynor, Professor, University of Tennessee
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01441544     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 8630B
Study First Received: September 25, 2011
Last Updated: July 14, 2017

Keywords provided by Hollie Raynor, University of Tennessee:
active video games
Energy expenditure

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 21, 2017