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Effects of a Manualized Short-term Treatment of Internet and Computer Game Addiction (STICA)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01434589
First Posted: September 15, 2011
Last Update Posted: October 11, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
M.E. Beutel, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
  Purpose
The purpose of this study is to 1) determine the efficacy of manualized Short-term Treatment of Internet and Computer game Addiction (STICA), assess 2) the durability of treatment response in these patients and 3) the impact on associated psychiatric symptoms, e.g. social anxiety and depression.

Condition Intervention
Addiction Behavioral: STICA Intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of a Manualized Short-term Treatment of Internet and Computer Game Addiction

Further study details as provided by M.E. Beutel, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in internet or computer game addiction (self-rating) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change/Remission of internet or computer game addiction (expert rating) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]
  • Preoccupation with critical internet applications or computer games (hours per week) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]
  • Improvement of negative consequences (e.g. social communication, psychosocial well being) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]
  • Improvement of depressive symptoms (changes in BDI-II) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]
  • Improvement of social fear and avoidance (changes in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]
  • Improvement of Expectances of self-efficacy (Changes in Assessment of Self-Efficacy) [ Time Frame: 4 and 10 months after randomization ]

Enrollment: 187
Study Start Date: January 2012
Study Completion Date: August 2017
Primary Completion Date: June 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: Wait list control
Experimental: STICA Intervention Behavioral: STICA Intervention
Manualized Short-term Treatment for Internet and Computer game Addiction (STICA) based on cognitive behavior-therapy (combining individual and group therapy)

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   17 Years to 55 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • clinical diagnosis of internet or computer game addiction
  • internet or computer game addiction according to the AICA-Checklist(Assessment of Internet and Computer game addiction, expert Rating)
  • a score >/= 7 in the AICA-S (Assessment of Internet and Computer game addiction, Self Rating)
  • patients with primary diagnoses of internet or computer game addiction
  • if currently on psychotropic medications, no change in medications and dosages in the past 2 months and during STICA treatment
  • if currently off all psychotropic medications, patient has been off at least 4 weeks
  • at least 4 weeks off from last psychotherapy and no other ongoing psychotherapy

Exclusion Criteria:

  • current Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) < 40
  • severe major depression (BDI-II Score >/= 29)
  • current alcohol or drug addictions
  • personality disorders: borderline, antisocial, schizoid and schizotypal
  • lifetime diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar or organic mental disorder
  • current unstable medical illness
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01434589


Locations
Austria
Anton Proksch Insitut, Therapy Centre for the Treatment of Addictions
Vienna, Austria, 1230
Germany
University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Outpatient clinic for behavioral addictions
Mainz, Germany, 55131
Central Insitute for Mental Health
Mannheim, Germany, 68159
University Medical Center Tübingen
Tübingen, Germany, 72076
Sponsors and Collaborators
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Investigators
Principal Investigator: M. E. Beutel, Prof. Dr. University Medical Center Mainz, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy
  More Information

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: M.E. Beutel, Univ.-Prof. Dr.med. Dipl.-Psych. M.E. Beutel, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01434589     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BE 2248/10-1
First Submitted: September 8, 2011
First Posted: September 15, 2011
Last Update Posted: October 11, 2017
Last Verified: October 2017

Keywords provided by M.E. Beutel, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz:
internet addiction
computer game addiction
STICA
short-term treatment
psychotherapy
internet and computer game addiction

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Behavior, Addictive
Compulsive Behavior
Impulsive Behavior