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Performance of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) During Spontaneous Breathing Trial

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01337271
First Posted: April 18, 2011
Last Update Posted: September 12, 2013
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Sao Paulo General Hospital
  Purpose
The purpose of this study is to compare a new mode of mechanical ventilation (NAVA, or Neurally adjusted Ventilatory assist) with a traditional mode (Pressure Support ventilation) on its the ability to detect patients ready for extubation (liberation from mechanical ventilation).

Condition Intervention
Respiratory Failure Procedure: SBT- PSV Procedure: SBT - NAVA

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Care Provider)
Primary Purpose: Screening
Official Title: Performance of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) During an Spontaneous Breathing Trial

Further study details as provided by University of Sao Paulo General Hospital:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • rate of success on the spontaneous breathing trial [ Time Frame: 30 minutes, or earlier (if the SBT is interrupted for intolerance), i.e., at the end of the spontaneous breathing trial ]
    The ICU team will observe the patient during the spontaneous breathing trial, and use standard objective (blood gases) and subjective (including respiratory rate, tidal volume, comfort, hemodynamic variables) variables to determine if the patient tolerates the SBT and therefore is ready for discontinuation from mechanical ventilation


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Extubation failure rate [ Time Frame: 48 hours after extubation ]
    Patients who are extubated within 24 hours of the completion of the study will be followed for 48h, and if re-intubation is required within these first 48h after the extubation, the investigators will consider that the patient had extubation failure


Enrollment: 20
Study Start Date: May 2011
Study Completion Date: September 2013
Primary Completion Date: September 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: PSV Procedure: SBT- PSV
An Spontaneous breathing trial for 30 minutes on pressure support ventilation, which is a commonly used strategy to evaluate readiness for extubation
Other Name: SBT
Procedure: SBT - NAVA
An spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) on the ventilatory mode NAVA, with ventilatory support titrated to be similar to the support provided during an SBT on pressure support mode (PSV). NAVA captures the electrical activity of the diaphragm with an esophageal-gastric catheter, and uses the electrical signal to deliver inspiratory pressure proportional to the intensity of patient effort, as well as to trigger and cycle assisted mechanical breaths.
Other Names:
  • NAVA
  • N.A.V.A.
Experimental: NAVA Procedure: SBT- PSV
An Spontaneous breathing trial for 30 minutes on pressure support ventilation, which is a commonly used strategy to evaluate readiness for extubation
Other Name: SBT
Procedure: SBT - NAVA
An spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) on the ventilatory mode NAVA, with ventilatory support titrated to be similar to the support provided during an SBT on pressure support mode (PSV). NAVA captures the electrical activity of the diaphragm with an esophageal-gastric catheter, and uses the electrical signal to deliver inspiratory pressure proportional to the intensity of patient effort, as well as to trigger and cycle assisted mechanical breaths.
Other Names:
  • NAVA
  • N.A.V.A.

Detailed Description:

Patients under mechanical ventilation who are suspected to be recovered and ready to return to spontaneous ventilation often undergo an spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) before extubation and liberation from mechanical ventilation. During the test, which lasts from 30 minutes to 2 hours , the patient receives minimal support from the ventilator, and the ICU team observes if the patient develops any signs or symptoms of discomfort or respiratory distress. If the patient tolerates the test, he or she is considered ready for extubation. The Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a new mode of ventilation, shown to improve patient-ventilator synchrony. It has not been tested during SBTs. Our objective is to compare the performance of NAVA with the commonly used Pressure Support ventilation, during an SBT. Patients considered to be ready for an SBT by the ICU team will undergo two SBTs in random order: one in pressure support, and the other on NAVA, with a 1-hour interval between the tests. Ventilatory parameters and patient-ventilator interaction variables will be compared among the two tests.

This study will help us understand if NAVA can be used during an SBT, which might be important for patients who are being ventilated with NAVA before the SBT is suggested, especially those how present a high asynchrony rate when ventilated with Pressure Support Mode.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours
  • Considered ready for an spontaneous breathing trial by the ICU team
  • informed consent for participation on the study signed by a family member

Exclusion Criteria:

  • age < 18yrs
  • pregnancy
  • facial trauma or burns that might interfere with the esophageal catheter placement
  • nasal pathologies that prevent adequate placement of the catheter
  • esophageal varices or gastroesophageal bleeding in the past 30 days
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01337271


Locations
Brazil
Respiratory ICU
Sao Paulo, Brazil
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Sao Paulo General Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Juliana C Ferreira, MD University of Sao Paulo
  More Information

Responsible Party: University of Sao Paulo General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01337271     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2010-345
First Submitted: April 12, 2011
First Posted: April 18, 2011
Last Update Posted: September 12, 2013
Last Verified: September 2013

Keywords provided by University of Sao Paulo General Hospital:
artificial, ventilation
mechanical ventilation
weaning

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Respiratory Insufficiency
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases