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Effects of Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) in Obese Women Undergoing Open Bariatric Surgery

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01321983
First Posted: March 24, 2011
Last Update Posted: March 24, 2011
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
Meridional Hospital
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico
Information provided by:
Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos
  Purpose

OBJECTIVE: to determine whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is able to attenuate the impact of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes and diaphragmatic excursion in obese women undergoing open bariatric surgery.

Therefore, the hypothesis of the present study was that preoperative IMT is able to attenuate the negative effects of surgical trauma on the respiratory muscle strength, in the lung volumes and diaphragmatic excursion, thus reducing the risk of PPC, in obese patients undergoing open bariatric surgery.

DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Meridional Hospital, Cariacica/ES, Brazil. SUBJECTS: Thirty-two obese women undergoing elective open bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive preoperative inspiratory muscle training (IMT group) or usual care (control group).

MAIN MEASURES: Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure - MIP and maximal expiratory pressure - MEP), lung volumes and diaphragmatic excursion.


Condition Intervention
Preoperative Inspiratory Muscular Training Bariatric Surgery Chest Physiotherapy Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Obesity Other: Inspiratory muscular training - IMT

Study Type: Interventional
Official Title: Effects of Preoperative Inspiratory Muscle Training (IMT) in Obese Women Undergoing Open Bariatric Surgery: Respiratory Muscle Strength, Lung Volumes and Diaphragmatic Excursion

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos:

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Female,
  • Over 18 years of age,
  • No smoking or respiratory disease.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who refused to participate in the steps of the research protocol,
  • Patients with a history of prior abdominal surgery,
  • Patients who were unable to understand and perform the tests properly
  • Patients who refused to sign the Informed Consent Term.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01321983


Locations
Brazil
Meridional Hospital
Cariacica, Espirito Santo, Brazil, 29151920
Sponsors and Collaborators
Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos
Meridional Hospital
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico
  More Information

Additional Information:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01321983     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 141299/2009-6
First Submitted: March 23, 2011
First Posted: March 24, 2011
Last Update Posted: March 24, 2011
Last Verified: March 2011

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Respiratory Aspiration
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Pathologic Processes