We updated the design of this site on December 18, 2017. Learn more.
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

LUPS-Lipids and Glucose Under Prospective Surveillance (LUPS)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01313156
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : March 11, 2011
Last Update Posted : March 11, 2011
City of Hamburg
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf
Information provided by:
Asklepios proresearch

Brief Summary:
Prospective, non-randomized cohort study to analyse genetic variations, dietary patterns, perceived stress and anxiety and early changes in lipid metabolism leading to the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

Condition or disease
Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, MetS, Diabetes Mellitus, Non-Insulin-Dependent

Detailed Description:
The LUPS-study is a collaboration between Asklepios Clinics Hamburg GmbH and University Clinic Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany. This study is assessing a multitude of serum biomarkers, anthropometrics, dietary habits, physical activity, perceived stress along with genetic information from "healthy workers" (25-60years) to better understand phenotype-genotype associations leading to MetS and type 2 diabetes.

Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 1962 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Lipids and Glucose Under Prospective Surveillance
Study Start Date : November 2008
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2020

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

U.S. FDA Resources

Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes [ Time Frame: 10 years ]
    assessing risk factors, e.g. HDL, BMI, Blood Pressure, FPG

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

Ages Eligible for Study:   25 Years to 60 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
so-called "Healthy-Workers", aged 25-60years, of Lufthansa-Technik, Hamburg, Germany, who voluntarily aggreed to participate in the study.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 25-60 years men and women willing to give consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • diabetes (type 1 or 2)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01313156

Asklepios Klinik St.Georg
Hamburg, Germany, 20099
Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf
Hamburg, Germany, 20246
Sponsors and Collaborators
Asklepios proresearch
City of Hamburg
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf
Principal Investigator: Dirk Mueller-Wieland, Prof., MD Asklepios Klinik St.Georg, Hamburg, Germany
Principal Investigator: Karl Wegscheider, Prof., PHD Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany

Responsible Party: 1.Prof. Mueller-Wieland; 2.Prof.Wegscheider, 1.Asklepios Klinik St.Georg, I.Med.; 2. Universitätsklinikum HH-Eppendorf, Abtlg.f. Epidemiologie
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01313156     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AKS#1833
First Posted: March 11, 2011    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 11, 2011
Last Verified: March 2011

Keywords provided by Asklepios proresearch:
Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, MetS,
Type 2 Diabetes

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Diabetes Mellitus
Metabolic Syndrome X
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Insulin Resistance
Pathologic Processes
Endocrine System Diseases