We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Prospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic and Open Incisional Hernia Repair: a Multicenter Cohort Study (IHR_SALTC)

This study has been terminated.
(Recruitment problems)
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01280370
First Posted: January 20, 2011
Last Update Posted: September 13, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
  Purpose

Nowadays incisional hernia are primarily repaired using prosthetic meshes. In Switzerland such meshes are mainly implanted via open or laparoscopic approach. The differential impact of these two types of surgical technique on recurrence rate will be investigated with this study.

With this multicenter cohort study the outcomes of laparoscopic and open incisional hernia repair will be investigated prospectively. Hernia recurrence is the main outcome measure.

Hypothesis:

Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is associated with a lower recurrence rate compared to open incisional hernia repair.


Condition Intervention
Incisional Hernia Repair Procedure: Abdominal surgery

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Prospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic and Open Hernia Repair: a Multicenter Cohort Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University Hospital Inselspital, Berne:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • recurrence rate [ Time Frame: 36 months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • surgical site infections [ Time Frame: 36 months ]
  • chronic pain [ Time Frame: 36 months ]
  • length of hospital stay [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
  • morbidity [ Time Frame: 3 months ]
  • cosmetic results [ Time Frame: 36 months ]
  • rigidity of the abdominal wall [ Time Frame: 36 months ]

Enrollment: 371
Study Start Date: September 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date: July 2019 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
1
1.patients treated in a laparoscopic manner
2.
2. patients treated in open operative manner
Procedure: Abdominal surgery
intraoperative mesh implantation

Detailed Description:

Background

Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication following abdominal surgery and is estimated to occur in 11-23% 1-3. Incisional hernia can be repaired by an open or by a laparoscopic approach. For incisional hernia prosthetic meshes are nowadays implanted for virtually all open and laparoscopic procedures.

The use of laparoscopy for the treatment of incisional hernia was first reported in 1993 by LeBlanc and Booth 4. Short term follow-up studies show that laparoscopic surgery is associated with decreased postoperative pain, reduced risks of surgical site infections due to minimal tissue dissection, a shorter length of hospital stay and a shorter overall recovery period 5-9.

Important long- term outcome parameters are recurrence rate and chronic pain 10,11. Recurrence after incisional hernia repair varies widely and ranges from 1% to 35% 1,3. Morbid obesity, a previous failed open repair, large defect size and postoperative complications are associated with an increased risk for recurrence 12. Heterogeneity of hernia size and follow-up further complicate comparison of the recurrence rate between different techniques. On average, 74% of recurrences occur within the first 3 years after initial repair 13. Series with an acceptable follow-up of at least 24 months report a recurrence rate in open and laparoscopic repair of approximately 10% 1. Currently, no well designed prospective study is available comparing the incidence of recurrence between open and laparoscopic incisional hernia repair.

Such variability of patients characteristics, surgical techniques and surgical skills are likely to confound a prospective randomized trial. Consequently, a cohort study is performed allowing each surgeon to perform the technique he is most familiar with.

The aim of this multicenter cohort study is to assess the incidence of recurrence 36 months after open and laparoscopic incisional hernia repair, performed in swiss hospitals.

Objective

All patients undergoing elective incisional hernia repair who meet the inclusion criteria (see below) are eligible for inclusion into the study. These patients will be informed about the details of the study preoperatively. After a patient has agreed to enroll into the study and has signed written informed consent, he/she will be advised to attend follow-up assessments according to the study plan.

Methods

All patients undergoing elective incisional hernia repair who meet the inclusion criteria (see below) are eligible for inclusion into the study. These patients will be informed about the details of the study preoperatively. After a patient has agreed to enroll into the study and has signed written informed consent, he/she will be advised to attend follow-up assessments according to the study plan.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Patients undergoing incisional hernia repair
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients over 18 years old
  • Written informed consent
  • Primary or recurrent incisional hernia

Exclusion Criteria

  • Systemic or severe local infections
  • Emergency procedures
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01280370


Locations
Switzerland
Dep. of Visceral and transplant surgery, Berne University Hospital
Berne, Switzerland, 3010
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Guido Beldi, Prof. Dr. med. Berne, University Hospital, University of Berne, Switzerland
  More Information

Responsible Party: University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01280370     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 231/09
First Submitted: January 19, 2011
First Posted: January 20, 2011
Last Update Posted: September 13, 2016
Last Verified: September 2016

Keywords provided by University Hospital Inselspital, Berne:
Incisional hernia repair

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hernia
Incisional Hernia
Hernia, Ventral
Pathological Conditions, Anatomical
Postoperative Complications
Pathologic Processes
Hernia, Abdominal