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Analysis of Sport Specific Adaptations of the Shoulder in Adolescent Elite Handball Players and the Influence of the Preventive Use of Tape on These Outcome Measurements.

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01266278
First Posted: December 24, 2010
Last Update Posted: June 23, 2011
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University Ghent
  Purpose

Shoulder complaints are very common in overhead athletes.The application of kinesiotape that keeps the shoulder in a correct position is used to avoid this.

This could enlarge the dynamic size of the subacromial space and thus contribute to prevention of shoulder injuries.

30 young elite handball players will participate in this study.Researchers will perform a number of measurements before and after applying kinesiotape to correct shoulder position:

  • measurement of subacromial space
  • measurement of 3D kinematics of shoulder
  • assessment of shoulder posture

Hypothesis of this study is that tape can influence the position of the scapula and is therefore able to change the size of the subacromial space.This results in a more efficient use of shoulder muscles with higher maximal strength as a result and maximizes shoulder mobility.


Condition Intervention
Risk Factors for Shoulder Injuries Other: Dynamic ultrasound Other: FASTRAK Other: Assessment of shoulder posture by measuring

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Analysis of Sport Specific Adaptations of the Shoulder in Adolescent Elite Handball Players and the Influence of the Preventive Use of Tape on Shoulder Strength, Mobility, the Position of the Scapula and the Size of the Subacromial Space.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University Ghent:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • effect of kinesiotape [ Time Frame: 2 days ]
    Immediate effects of applying kinesiotape to the correct shoulder position


Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: November 2010
Study Completion Date: November 2010
Primary Completion Date: November 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Kinesiotape
Kinesiotape will be applied to the correct shoulder position of the participants.
Other: Dynamic ultrasound
Measurement of the size of the subacromial space with dynamic ultrasound.
Other: FASTRAK
Measurements of the 3D-kinematics of the shoulder with FASTRAK. Sensors are placed on the skin of the shoulder with adhesive tape.
Other: Assessment of shoulder posture by measuring
Assessment of shoulder posture by measuring several angles and distances.

Detailed Description:

Shoulder complaints are very common in overhead athletes. Throwing motions question large explosive strength and stability of the intrinsic instable shoulder joint. Malpositioning of the scapula increases the risk of overload injuries.

The application of kinesiotape that keeps the shoulder in a correct position is used to avoid this. Until now no studies have shown if the tape is able to correct the position of the scapula. If this is the case, the application of the tape could enlarge the dynamic size of the subacromial space (virtual space in the shoulder in which rotator cuff tendons run through) and thus contribute to prevention of shoulder injuries.

This study will take place in collaboration with Prof. Dr. Robert Van Cingel, director of the Sports Medical Center Papendal(SMCP) in the Netherlands. SMCP is a multidisciplinary center for sports medicine, sports rehabilitation and sports cardiology.

30 young elite handball players will participate in this study. Three researchers will perform a number of measurements before and after applying kinesiotape to correct shoulder position.

  1. Measurement of the size of the subacromial space with dynamic ultrasound. Ultrasound is completely harmless and painless.
  2. Measurement of three-dimensional kinematics of the shoulder with FASTRAK. Sensors are placed on the skin of the shoulder with adhesive tape. Both placement of markers and measurements are non-invasive and painless.
  3. Assessment of shoulder posture by measuring several angles and distances. Measurement of shoulder strength and mobility. These measurements are all non-invasive and painless.

Hypothesis of this study is that tape can influence the position of the scapula and is therefore able to change the size of the subacromial space. This results in a more efficient use of shoulder muscles with higher maximal strength as a result and maximizes shoulder mobility.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years to 25 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Elite handball players of Papendal
  • age between 15 and 25
  • more than 15 hours of handball training/week
  • female

Exclusion Criteria:

  • shoulder pain at the moment for which a doctor was consulted
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01266278


Locations
Netherlands
Sports Medical Center of Papendal
Arnhem, Netherlands
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Ghent
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ann Cools, Ph.D. University Ghent
  More Information

Responsible Party: Prof. Dr. Ann Cools, University Ghent
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01266278     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: EC/2010/637
First Submitted: December 14, 2010
First Posted: December 24, 2010
Last Update Posted: June 23, 2011
Last Verified: June 2011

Keywords provided by University Ghent:
shoulder injuries

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Shoulder Injuries
Wounds and Injuries