Now Available: Final Rule for FDAAA 801 and NIH Policy on Clinical Trial Reporting

Omega-3 Fatty Acids For Treatment Of Young Children With Autism (OMG)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
The Hospital for Sick Children
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Evdokia Anagnostou, Anagnostou, Evdokia, M.D.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01248728
First received: November 22, 2010
Last updated: April 12, 2016
Last verified: April 2016
  Purpose
This is a pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acids in autism. Autism, originally described by Kanner in 1943, is among the most severe of neurodevelopmental disorders. It is a Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) affecting social and communicative functions and is also characterized by repetitive behaviors/restricted interests. It is also frequently accompanied by significant aggression, self-injury, irritability and hyperactivity, making care for these individuals an even greater challenge for families or institutional settings. Autism severely impacts the affected individual and family members, causing life-long functional impairment. In this protocol the investigators will use the terms "autism" and "autism spectrum disorder (ASD)" interchangeably to refer to Autistic disorder, Asperger Syndrome and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified (NOS).

Condition Intervention Phase
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Dietary Supplement: Placebo
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in the Treatment of Young Children With Autism

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Anagnostou, Evdokia, M.D.:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change From Baseline in the Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Behavioral Inventory (PDDBI) - Autism Composite Score [ Time Frame: Baseline and 24 Weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The PDDBI measures autism symptomology. The autism composite score was used as the primary outcome measure for autism symptom severity.

    PDDBI Autism Composite Scale Range:

    Minimum Range = 10 (lower autism symptom severity) Maximum Range = 100 (higher autism symptom severity)

    The Autism Composite is calculated from the sum of T-scores of the Sensory/Perceptual Approach Behaviours, Ritualisms/Resistance to Change, Social Pragmatic Problems, and Semantic/Pragmatic Problems domains subtracted by the sum of T-scores of the Social Approach Behaviours, and Expressive Language domain then converted into the Autism Composite as a T-score.

    Mean change between baseline and week 24 is reported. A negative change indicates improvement


  • Change From Baseline in the Behaviour Assessment System for Children (BASC-2) - Externalizing Problems Composite [ Time Frame: Baseline and 24 Weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The BASC-2 externalizing problems composite measures hyperactivity and aggressive behaviours.

    Primary Outcome domain: Externalizing Problems composite

    Externalizing Problems Composite T-Score Range:

    Minimum Range: 10 (lower externalizing problems) Maximum Range: 120 (higher externalizing problems)

    The Externalizing Problems composite is computed from the sum of t-scores from the hyperactivity and aggression subscales then converted into the externalizing problems composite t-score.

    Mean change between baseline and week 24 is reported. A negative change indicates improvement.



Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Number of Participants Classified as Responders by the Clinical Global Impression - Improvement (CGI-I) [ Time Frame: 24 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    The CGI-I is a seven-point scale that provides a clinician rating of global improvement and as such is already inherently a measure of change. It requires the clinician to assess the degree to which the participant's illness has improved or worsened relative to a baseline state before the intervention.

    Change is rated as:

    0- Not assessed

    1. Very Much Improved
    2. Much Improved
    3. Minimally Improved
    4. No Change
    5. Minimally Worse
    6. Much Worse
    7. Very Much Worse

    Participants are classified as responders if their CGI-I score was 1 or 2 and non-responders for CGI-I scores of 3 to 7.


  • Change From Baseline in the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS) - Adaptive Functioning Composite [ Time Frame: Baseline and 24 Weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The VABS is a measure of adaptive behavior in daily settings. Secondary measure domain: The adaptive functioning composite describes an individuals overall functioning

    Adaptive Behaviour Composite Standard Score Range:

    Minimum range: 20 (low adaptive functioning) Maximum range: 160 (high adaptive functioning)

    The adaptive behaviour composite standard score is computed from the sum of standard scores from the communication, daily living skills, socialization and motor skills domains and converted into the adaptive behavior composite standard score.

    Change in the adaptive behaviour composite standard score from baseline to week 24 is reported. Positive change indicates improvement.


  • Change From Baseline in the Preschool Language Scale (PLS-4) - Total Language [ Time Frame: Baseline and 24 Weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    The PLS-4 is a language measure that provides a global assessment of a child's language functioning abilities, receptive and expressive language.

    Secondary outcome measure domain: Total language standard score

    Total Language Standard Score Range:

    Minimum range: 50 (lower language abilities) Maximum range: 150 (higher language abilities)

    The total language standard score is computed from a sum of the auditory comprehension and expressive communication standard scores, then converted into the total language standard score.

    Change of total language standard scores from baseline to week 24 is reported. Positive change indicates improvement



Enrollment: 38
Study Start Date: November 2010
Study Completion Date: June 2014
Primary Completion Date: December 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Children will be administered 3.75ml of the liquid formulation of Nutra Sea high-EPA (HP) (containing 1.5 gr of EPA+DHA). The starting dose will be 1.875ml (0.75 gr of EPA+DHA) and the dose will be doubled on week 2.
Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Children will be administered 3.75ml of the liquid formulation of Nutra Sea HP (containing 1.5 gr of EPA+DHA). The starting dose will be 1.875ml (0.75 gr of EPA+DHA) and the dose will be doubled on week 2. The parents may choose to give this as a single dose or split it to two doses if stomach upset occurs. This formulation is double distilled and has very little fishy taste, which will make it more palatable for children and will make creating a matching placebo a simpler process.
Other Name: Nutra Sea HP
Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Children will be administered 3.75ml of the liquid formulation of Placebo. The starting dose will be 1.875ml and the dose will be doubled on week 2.
Dietary Supplement: Placebo
Children will be administered 3.75ml of the liquid formulation of Placebo. The starting dose will be 1.875ml and the dose will be doubled on week 2. The parents may choose to give this as a single dose or split it to two doses if stomach upset occurs. This formulation is double distilled and has very little fishy taste, which will make it more palatable for children and will make creating a matching placebo a simpler process.
Other Name: Placebo Comparator

Detailed Description:
Currently risperidone is the only medication approved the by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this disorder, and specifically for irritability associated with autism, although not all patients with autism respond to risperidone. No pharmacologic treatments have been approved for use in preschool children, although it is clear that early intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Behavioral and educational therapies play a significant role in the management of autistic symptoms. The history of alternative treatments in autism is notable for the exaggerated benefit of a variety of supplements, such as high dose vitamins (e.g. B6, magnesium), and secretin. The current widespread use of alternative/nutritional supplements to patients with autism without scientifically demonstrated efficacy, underscores the necessity for scientifically sound studies to be conducted. Complementary and alternative medical therapies (CAM) are commonly employed by families of autistic children. Recent surveys have estimated the prevalence of such use to be between 30% and 95% (1,2,3). Omega-3 fatty acids were reported to be used in 28.7% of patients (1). However, only two small case series and a very small randomized study have been reported in this population to date. The investigators propose to conduct a randomized controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acids in preschoolers with ASD.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   2 Years to 5 Years   (Child)
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Male or female outpatients 2-5 years of age.
  2. Meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV) criteria. DSM-IV criteria for an autism spectrum disorder, (Autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome or PDD-NOS) will be established by a clinician with expertise with individuals with ASD based on parent interview, Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADO) and Autism Diagnostic Interview (ADI-R)
  3. If already receiving stable non pharmacologic educational, behavioral, dietary and or/ natural health product interventions during the preceding 3 months prior to Screening, will not electively initiate new or modify ongoing interventions for the duration of the study unless the child's condition is worsening or their turn comes up on the treatment waiting list.
  4. Have normal physical examination and laboratory test results at Screening. If abnormal, the finding(s) must be deemed clinically insignificant by the Investigator.
  5. The parents must be able to speak and understand English sufficiently to allow for the completion of all study assessments.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Patients born prior to 35 weeks gestational age.
  2. Patients with any primary psychiatric diagnosis other than autism at Screening. We are aware the most primary psychiatric disorders are unlikely to be diagnosed in this age group
  3. Patients with a medical history of neurological disease, including, but not limited to, epilepsy/seizure disorder (except simple febrile seizures), movement disorder, tuberous sclerosis, fragile X, and any other known genetic syndromes, or known abnormal MRI/structural lesion of the brain.
  4. Patients with a medical condition that might interfere with the conduct of the study, confound interpretation of the study results, or endanger their own well-being. Patients with evidence or history of malignancy or any significant hematological, endocrine, cardiovascular (including any rhythm disorder), respiratory, renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal disease, or coagulation deficits.
  5. Patients taking psychoactive medication(s) (e.g.,stimulants, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, anxiolytics, clonidine).
  6. Patients that have been off pharmacotherapy for less than 6 weeks.
  7. Patients who are participating in another clinical trial
  8. Patients on anticoagulants
  9. Patients who know that they will initiate or change nonpharmacologic interventions during the course of the study.
  10. Patients unable to tolerate venipuncture procedures for blood sampling.
  11. Patients taking Omega-3 supplements who have not discontinued treatment for six weeks prior to entering into the study.
  12. Patients who have allergies to any of the ingredients in omega-3 (study product) or the placebo.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01248728

Locations
Canada, Ontario
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M4G 1R8
Sponsors and Collaborators
Evdokia Anagnostou
Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
The Hospital for Sick Children
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Evdokia Anagnostou, M.D. Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
  More Information

Responsible Party: Evdokia Anagnostou, Clinician Scientist, Anagnostou, Evdokia, M.D.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01248728     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 09-018 
Study First Received: November 22, 2010
Results First Received: December 16, 2015
Last Updated: April 12, 2016
Health Authority: Canada: Health Canada

Keywords provided by Anagnostou, Evdokia, M.D.:
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Clinical Trial
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Toddlers

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Autistic Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 29, 2016