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The Effect of 16 Weeks of Hip Adduction and Abduction Resistance Exercise (Ad/Ab)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01228877
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 27, 2010
Last Update Posted : October 27, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

Study Description
Brief Summary:

Performing adduction and abduction resistance exercise will increase hip bone density and strength to a greater extent than doing squat and deadlift exercise.

Aim #1: To determine if doing hip adduction and abduction resistance exercise training for 16 weeks improves spine bone mineral density and hip bone mineral density and strength as determined by finite element modeling.

Aim #2: To compare the effects of hip adduction and abduction exercise to squat and deadlift exercise with respect to potential changes in hip bone mineral density and strength.

Aim #3: To determine if the addition of adduction and abduction exercise to squat and deadlift exercise promotes an "additive" effect with respect to changes in spine bone mineral density and hip bone mineral density and bone strength.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Osteoporosis Osteopenia Sarcopenia Other: exercise

Detailed Description:

The investigators will carry out a 16-week exercise training study (n=24) consisting of 3 groups (n=8 per group) of healthy, non-resistance trained adult men and women (age 25-55 years). Our aim is to determine if hip adduction and abduction resistance exercise is more effective than squat and deadlift exercise with respect to changes in the whole bone strength and density of the proximal femur and spine.

Group A will do only hip adduction and abduction exercises. Group B will do only squat and deadlift exercise Group C will do a combination of hip adduction and abduction and squat and deadlift exercise

Subjects will be imaged with quantitative computed tomography (QCT) of the proximal femur and spine, pre-training and post-training, to determine changes in spinal bone density and proximal femoral bone density and strength.

Serum assays of bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption (serum CTX type I) will be performed four times during the study at 4 week intervals.


Study Design

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 22 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: The Effect of 16 Weeks of Hip Adduction and Abduction Resistance Exercise Training on Strength and Density of the Proximal Femur
Study Start Date : December 2010
Primary Completion Date : June 2012
Study Completion Date : September 2012

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

U.S. FDA Resources

Arms and Interventions

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Exercise
Adduction, Abduction and Squat exercise three times a week for 16 weeks
Other: exercise
Adduction, Abduction and Squat exercise three times a week for 16 weeks


Outcome Measures

Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Reduce risk of hip fracture [ Time Frame: 16 weeks ]
    The investigators have prioritized the last year of NSBRI funding to test one the capabilities of our device, standing hip adduction/abduction exercise, to strengthen the proximal femoral bone. We believe that if we are able to detect increases in bone density and strength (assessed using quantitative computed tomography of the hip pre- and post-training) in healthy volunteers, this will be solid preliminary evidence to support modification of exercise protocols currently being used to reduce the rate of bone loss on the International Space Station.


Eligibility Criteria

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Ages Eligible for Study:   25 Years to 55 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy men and women
  • Age of 25 to 55 years old

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Hypertension (High blood pressure)
  • Diabetes or metabolic syndrome
  • Hyperlipidemia (High cholesterol)
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Asthma or other pulmonary disease (i.e. COPD)
  • not pregnant
  • have no joint or mobility limitations
  • do not exercise on a regular basis
Contacts and Locations

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01228877


Locations
United States, California
UCSF-Department of radiology-China Basin
San Francisco, California, United States, 94107
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, San Francisco
National Space Biomedical Research Institute
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Thomas Lang, PhD UCSF-Department of Radiology
More Information

Responsible Party: University of California, San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01228877     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Ad/Ab exercise
First Posted: October 27, 2010    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 27, 2017
Last Verified: October 2017

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Osteoporosis
Sarcopenia
Bone Diseases, Metabolic
Bone Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Metabolic Diseases
Muscular Atrophy
Neuromuscular Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Atrophy
Pathological Conditions, Anatomical
Signs and Symptoms