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Cerebellar rTMS for the Treatment of Schizophrenic Patients

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01072617
First received: February 19, 2010
Last updated: April 28, 2017
Last verified: April 2017
  Purpose
The primary aim of this protocol is to determine whether the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over vermis of the cerebellum may be safe and therapeutically effective in patients with schizophrenia. Because this is the first evaluation of this treatment in this population, the focus of this study is safety.

Condition Intervention
Schizophrenia Device: Transcranial magnetic stimulation via MagPro x100 device

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: No masking
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Safety and Therapeutic Efficacy of Cerebellar Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients With Schizophrenia

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Adverse Events [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ]
    Adverse event collection at baseline, daily for 5 days during treatment, every other day by phone until the final assessment at week 1 follow up visit.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) - Positive Subscale [ Time Frame: Baseline, 5 days (post-treatment), 1 week post treatment ]
    Potential therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Positive Subscale, a 7 item subscale measuring the presence/absence and severity of positive symptoms of schizophrenia. The minimum score is 7 and the maximum score is 49, with higher values representing greater symptom severity. Therapeutic efficacy was assessed at baseline, after 5 days of treatment, and 1 week post treatment. The overall PANSS total score (minimum = 30, maximum = 210) is computed by summing the positive, negative, and general subscales; and higher values represent more severe schizophrenia psychopathology.

  • Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) - Negative Subscale [ Time Frame: Baseline, 5 days (post-treatment), 1 week post treatment ]
    Potential therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) Negative Subscale, a 7 item subscale measuring the presence/absence and severity of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The minimum score is 7 and the maximum score is 49, with higher values representing greater symptom severity. Therapeutic efficacy was assessed at baseline, after 5 days of treatment, and 1 week post treatment. The overall PANSS total score (minimum = 30, maximum = 210) is computed by summing the positive, negative, and general subscales; and higher values represent more severe schizophrenia psychopathology.

  • Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) - General Subscale [ Time Frame: Baseline, 5 days (post-treatment), 1 week post treatment ]
    Potential therapeutic efficacy was evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) General Subscale, a 16 item subscale measuring the presence/absence and severity of general psychopathology of schizophrenia. The minimum score is 16 and the maximum score is 112, with higher values representing greater psychopathology severity. Therapeutic efficacy was assessed at baseline, after 5 days of treatment, and 1 week post treatment. The overall PANSS total score (minimum = 30, maximum = 210) is computed by summing the positive, negative, and general subscales; and higher values represent more severe schizophrenia psychopathology.


Enrollment: 8
Study Start Date: February 2008
Study Completion Date: April 2009
Primary Completion Date: April 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Safety of rTMS in schizophrenia patients
Participants will receive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation via MagPro x100 device to the vermis of cerebellum twice a day over 5 days
Device: Transcranial magnetic stimulation via MagPro x100 device

Participants will receive 10 repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions to the vermis of cerebellum using the MagPro x100 TMS device. These 10 rTMS sessions will be administered from Monday to Friday in five days, twice a day with a minimum of 4-hour gap between the sessions. Repetitive TMS will be applied with the intermittent theta burst pattern (iTBS). These parameters are known to cause excitation in brain activity.

Anatomically precise localization of rTMS will be achieved using a frameless stereotactic system.


  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Age between 18-65 years
  2. Diagnosis of schizophrenia according to DSM-IV criteria(by a board-certified psychiatrist)

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Prior neurosurgical procedures
  2. Any history of seizure
  3. Previous head injury
  4. Contraindication to TMS:

    1. Implanted pacemaker
    2. Medication pump
    3. Vagal stimulator
    4. Deep brain stimulator
    5. Metallic hardware in the head or scalp: shrapnel, surgical clips, or fragments from welding
    6. Signs of increased intracranial pressure
  5. TENS unit and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt
  6. Pregnancy or lactating; note that a negative pregnancy test will be required if the patient is a female in reproductive years
  7. Advanced liver, kidney, cardiac, or pulmonary disease as defined clinically or a terminal medical diagnosis consistent with survival < 1 year
  8. A history of significant alcohol or drug abuse in the prior six months
  9. No focal cortical insult can be present, including tumor or vascular malformation
  10. Patients may not be actively enrolled in a separate intervention study
  11. Patients unable to undergo a brain MR:

    a. claustrophobia refractory to anxiolytics ferromagnetic metal in the body such as a prosthetic heart valve, a pacemaker, or a brain aneurysm clip).

  12. Change in antipsychotic medication during the last 4 weeks
  13. Any emergency psychiatry department visit during the last 4 weeks
  14. Been an inpatient in a psychiatry clinic within the last month
  15. Any other axis I diagnosis
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01072617

Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02215
Sponsors and Collaborators
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Alvaro Pascual-Leone, MD, PhD Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  More Information

Responsible Party: Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Professor of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01072617     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2007P000395
Study First Received: February 19, 2010
Results First Received: January 20, 2017
Last Updated: April 28, 2017

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on June 23, 2017