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Home-Based Programs for Improving Sleep in Cancer Survivors

This study has been terminated.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00993928
First received: October 13, 2009
Last updated: January 11, 2017
Last verified: January 2017
  Purpose

RATIONALE: Following a program that uses written materials and pre-recorded mp3 devices may help improve the sleep of cancer survivors. It is not yet known which home-based program is more effective in improving the sleep of cancer survivors.

PURPOSE: This randomized phase II trial is comparing two home-based programs for improving sleep in cancer survivors.


Condition Intervention Phase
Cancer Survivor Fatigue Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment Sleep Disorders Behavioral: Home-based sleep intervention Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: A Randomized Phase II Trial Evaluating Two Non-pharmacologic Interventions in Cancer Survivors for the Treatment of Sleep-wake Disturbances

Further study details as provided by Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change of the (3 Day) Sleep Latency Time and Time to Fall Back Asleep After Awakening During the Night From Baseline to the End of Study at Week 7 [ Time Frame: Up to 7 weeks ]

    The primary analysis will compare the change in time (in minutes) to fall asleep from baseline to week 7 as reported by question 3 in the sleep diary: "How long did it take you to get to sleep last night?" and time to fall back asleep after awakening during the night as reported by question 6A on sleep dairy: "When waking up after first falling asleep, how long did it take you to fall back to sleep?"

    Data were analyzed as a percent change from baseline to week 7. The percent change were compared between arms using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test.



Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Efficacy of Home-based Interventions on the Number of Awakenings After Sleep, Sleep Quality, Sleep Difficulty, and Sleep Latency at Baseline and Weeks 4 and 7. [ Time Frame: Up to 7 weeks ]

    Overall efficacy was analyzed as a composite of 4 outcomes: 1. sleep difficulty, 2. sleep quality, 3. Number of awakenings, and 4. Sleep latency. These 4 outcomes were measured by the responses to the following questions, respectively:

    1. How difficult was it to get to sleep last night? (scale 1-5, 5 meaning very easy)
    2. How deeply did you sleep last night? (scale 1-5, 5 meaning very deeply)
    3. How many times did you awaken last night?
    4. How long did it take you to get to sleep last night?

    The 4 questions were analyzed as percent change from baseline after week 4 and after week 7. The percent change between arms was analyzed using a Wilcoxon test.


  • Comparing the Efficacy of Two Home-based Sleep Interventions as Therapy for Sleep-wake Disturbances as Measured by the Percent of People Who Show Improved Sleep Per the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) [ Time Frame: 7 weeks ]
    The PSQI has 19 items and seven component scales: subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep-wake disturbances, use of sleep medication, and daytime dysfunction. The scoring algorithm yields seven component scales on 0-3 scales which are summed to produce a global score on a 0-21 scale with higher values representing more severe sleep difficulty. The percentage of patients that showed improvement or worsening in sleep score from baseline to Week 7 were analyzed and compared using a Chi-squared test.

  • Total Mood Disturbance as Measured by Profiles of Mood States B (POMS-B) [ Time Frame: At baseline and week 7 ]
    The POMS-B is a shortened version of the original POMS with 30 items each asking the patient to select how he/she has been feeling during the past week with respect to an adjective such as "tense", "angry", "worn out", etc., on a 0-4 scale (0=not at all; 4=extremely). The POMS-B consists of six identifiable mood states (tension/anxiety, depression/dejection, anger/hostility, vigor/activity, fatigue/inertia, and confusion/bewilderment) and measures the patient's total mood disturbance. This study analyzed total mood disturbance (total scale score) as a secondary endpoints. Week 7 scores were analyzed as a percentage change from baseline. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare treatment arms.

  • Distress at Week 6 [ Time Frame: From baseline to week 7 ]
    The Distress Thermometer is a single-item tool which asks patients to describe how much distress he/she has been experiencing in the past week on a scale of 0 to 10 (0=no distress, 10=extreme distress). The Distress Thermometer was selected for this study due to its brevity. Week 7 distress measures were analyzed as percent change from baseline and analyzed between arms with a t-test.


Enrollment: 93
Study Start Date: April 2010
Study Completion Date: April 2015
Primary Completion Date: March 2014 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Arm A: Home-based sleep intervention with Device #1
Participants listen to a pre-recorded mp3 device #1 before retiring to sleep. Only patients in Arm A will have assigned bed and wake times based on their baseline diary.
Behavioral: Home-based sleep intervention
Participants will be asked to practice behaviors consistent with the stimulus control sheet and to read the sleep hygiene booklet.
Active Comparator: Arm B: Home-based sleep intervention with Device #2
Participants will listen to a pre-recorded mp3 device #2 before retiring to sleep. At the end of the study, participants assigned to pre-recorded mp3 device #2 will be offered pre-recorded mp3 device #1 for their own use.
Behavioral: Home-based sleep intervention
Participants will be asked to practice behaviors consistent with the stimulus control sheet and to read the sleep hygiene booklet.

Detailed Description:

OBJECTIVES:

Primary

  • To compare the efficacy of two home-based sleep interventions as therapy for sleep-wake disturbances,as measured by sleep latency or time to fall back asleep after initial sleep onset per sleep diaries, at baseline (week 1) and at the end of week 7 in cancer survivors.

Secondary

  • To compare the efficacy of these interventions as therapy for sleep-wake disturbances as measured by the number of awakenings after sleep, sleep quality, sleep difficulty, and sleep latency at baseline (week 1) and weeks 4 and 7 in these participants.
  • To compare the efficacy of these interventions as therapy for sleep-wake disturbances as measured by the percentage of participants in each group who show improved sleep per the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.
  • To compare the effects of these interventions on fatigue, mood disturbance, sleep, benefit, and distress in this patient population.
  • To describe the side effects associated with these interventions in these patients.
  • To describe patient practice habits and adherence measured via a sleep behavior record.
  • To explore symptom clusters in this patient population and look at distress as a mediating variable. (Exploratory)
  • To explore predictors of sleep quality. (Exploratory)

OUTLINE: This is a multicenter study. Patients are stratified according to current (≥ 1 per week in the past 4 weeks) pharmacological treatment, including anxiolytics, for insomnia or mood (yes vs no), current pharmacologic treatment for pain (yes vs no), sleep difficulty period (≤ 1 month vs > 1 month), and age (≤ 50 vs 51-70 vs > 70 years). Patients are randomized to 1 of 2 intervention groups.

  • Group 1: Participants receive a home-based sleep intervention comprising a Sleep Hygiene Education booklet, printed stimulus-control guidelines, instructions on sleeping restrictions, and a guided-imagery pre-recorded mp3 device. Participants meet with study personnel for intervention refinement and are asked to practice behaviors consistent with the stimulus-control sheet, to read the sleep hygiene booklet one chapter per day for 7 days during the first week, and then as needed during study. They are also instructed to use the CD, with or without headphones, in a quiet and comfortable place without lights for up to 30 minutes every day for 6 weeks before bedtime. Participants are instructed to go to sleep and wake at the same time every day during study intervention.
  • Group 2: Participants receive a home-based sleep intervention comprising a Sleep Hygiene Education booklet, printed stimulus-control guidelines, and a pre-recorded mp3 device containing short stories and essays. Participants meet with study personnel and are instructed to practice behaviors consistent with the stimulus control sheet, to read the sleep hygiene booklet, and use the CD as in group 1. Participants are not instructed about sleeping restrictions. They are offered the guided-imagery CD after study completion.

Patients complete a Three-Day Sleep Behavior Record for 3 consecutive days at baseline and during weeks 4 and 7 of study intervention. Patients also complete questionnaires on Numeric Analog Sleep for Pain Scale, daily use of CD, Sleep Hygiene Practice, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Profile of Mood States, Brief Fatigue Inventory, Distress Thermometer, Side-Effect Questionnaire, and a Subject Global Impression of Change at baseline, during weeks 2 and 6, and after completion of study intervention.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Prior diagnosis of cancer
  • At least 2 months and ≤ 24 months since completed curative-intent treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiotherapy)

    • Ongoing hormonal therapy (i.e., tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, casodex)
    • Concurrent trastuzumab and maintenance rituximab allowed
  • Sleep difficulty defined as self report of sleep latency of ≥ 30 minutes on 3 out of 7 nights in a week and wishing therapeutic intervention, and/or self report of waking up after first falling asleep and not being able to fall back asleep for ≥ 30 minutes on 3 out of 7 nights in a week
  • No history of diagnosis of primary insomnia (patient medical record, defined by having had behavioral, cognitive, or pharmacologic treatment) for > 30 consecutive days in the year before cancer diagnosis
  • No active cancer (i.e., not considered no evidence of disease)
  • No concurrent CNS malignancy
  • No history of diagnosed sleep disorder (i.e., obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs, or periodic leg movement disorder)

PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS:

  • ECOG performance status 0-1
  • Availability of a CD player and head or earphones
  • Ability to complete questionnaires
  • No uncontrolled chronic pain (i.e., pain score of ≥ 4 on Numeric Analogue Sleep and Pain Scale)
  • No diagnosis of major depression disorder, acute anxiety disorder, or schizophrenia per medical record
  • No hot flashes that interrupt sleep
  • Not working overnight hours and unable to change schedule
  • No emotional, psychological, or physical state that, according to physician and/or study personnel evaluation, would preclude adherence to daily home intervention implementation

PRIOR CONCURRENT THERAPY:

  • See Disease Characteristics
  • More than 4 days since prior corticosteroid, including inhaled steroids, of any dose for > 2 days
  • No prior experience with guided imagery or cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
  • No concurrent new herbal therapies

    • Stable dose of daily herbal supplements started ≥ 8 weeks before study intervention allowed
    • Herbal teas or herbs in various drink products allowed
  • No concurrent treatment with variable doses of any of the following:

    • Antidepressants
    • Anxiolytics
    • Pain medication (not including over the counter ad anti-inflammatory pain relievers)
  • Pharmacologic treatment for sleep/wake disturbances is allowed, but must be used for 4 weeks before study entry, and can be used daily or intermittently
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00993928

  Show 193 Study Locations
Sponsors and Collaborators
Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Investigators
Study Chair: Debra Barton, RN, PhD, AOCN, FAAN Mayo Clinic
  More Information

Responsible Party: Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00993928     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NCCTG-N07C4
NCI-2011-01978 ( Registry Identifier: CTRP (Clinical Trials Reporting System) )
CDR0000656564 ( Registry Identifier: PDQ (Physician Data Query) )
Study First Received: October 13, 2009
Results First Received: January 11, 2017
Last Updated: January 11, 2017

Keywords provided by Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology:
psychosocial effects of cancer and its treatment
fatigue
sleep disorders
cancer survivor

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Fatigue
Sleep Wake Disorders
Parasomnias
Signs and Symptoms
Nervous System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 25, 2017