Barriers to Adherence to Asthma Controller Meds in Low Income Urban Minority Adolescents (ADEPT)

This study has been completed.
Information provided by:
Rush University Medical Center Identifier:
First received: August 26, 2009
Last updated: NA
Last verified: August 2009
History: No changes posted

Poor adherence to appropriate asthma medications is an important risk factor contributing to high asthma morbidity and mortality in urban African American adolescents. As part of the ADEPT (Adolescent Disease Empowerment and Persistency Technology) for Asthma Pilot 2 study, a focus group was developed specifically to explore existing barriers to adherence among inner city African American adolescent asthmatics.


Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Qualitative Analysis of the Barriers to Adherence With Asthma Controller Medication Among Inner City African American Adolescents as Identified Through Focus Group Data

Further study details as provided by Rush University Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Focus groups explored whether a new communication medium improved adherence to asthma controller medications and to examine existing barriers to adherence among four urban African American adolescents with uncontrolled moderate persistent asthma

Enrollment: 4
Study Start Date: March 2008
Study Completion Date: August 2009
Primary Completion Date: August 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Barriers, Adherence, Asthma


Ages Eligible for Study:   12 Years to 15 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

four low income urban adolescents with uncontrolled moderate persistent asthma


Inclusion Criteria:

  • 12-18 years of age
  • self identify as African American
  • have persistent asthma
  • read at a minimum fourth grade reading level
  • be on a prescribed daily inhaled corticosteroid medication for asthma

Exclusion Criteria:

  • candidate refusal or presence of other co-morbidities
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its identifier: NCT00967720

Sponsors and Collaborators
Rush University Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Giselle S Mosnaim, MD Rush University Medical Center
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Giselle Mosnaim, MD, Rush University Medical Center Identifier: NCT00967720     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 08021601
Study First Received: August 26, 2009
Last Updated: August 26, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Bronchial Diseases
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Immune System Diseases
Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Respiratory Tract Diseases processed this record on October 13, 2015