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The Early Origins of Cardiovascular Disease

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified June 2009 by Danone Institute International.
Recruitment status was:  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00923039
First Posted: June 18, 2009
Last Update Posted: June 18, 2009
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
Danone Institute International
  Purpose

Small body size at birth, slow weight gain during infancy and increase in body mass index after 2 years are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. There is a large gap in our understanding of how early growth affects the cardiovascular system. Possible mechanisms include alterations in body composition, in cardiac structure, in vascular function, in renal function and epigenetic processes.

The Objective is to determine how size at birth and growth during infancy and childhood affect: body composition, cardiac structure and function, vascular and endothelial function, renal function, metabolic status and transcriptional and epigenetic characteristics.


Condition
Cardiovascular Disease

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: The Early Origins of Cardiovascular Disease : the Consequence of Growth Restriction During Foetal Life and Infancy on Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Adulthood

Further study details as provided by Danone Institute International:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • To determine how size at birth and growth during infancy and childhood affect: body composition, cardiac structure and function, vascular and endothelial function, renal function, metabolic status and transcriptional and epigenetic characteristics [ Time Frame: 3 years ]

Estimated Enrollment: 200
Study Start Date: June 2009
Groups/Cohorts
Exposed/ Not exposed

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 25 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
200 Young adult students will be recruited at the Preventive Medicine Centre at Université de la Méditerranée during their annual routine medical examination
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male and female volunteers students aged between 18-25 years old
  • Having growth records

Exclusion Criteria:

  • If young women subject without contraception,or pregnant
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00923039


Contacts
Contact: Umberto SIMEONI, MD,PhD 33 (0)4 91 38 40 30 umberto.simeoni@mail.ap-hm.fr
Contact: Olivier BLIN, MD,PhD 33 (0)4 91 38 75 63 olivier.blin@mail.ap-hm.fr

Locations
France
CIC-UPCET Hopital de la Timone Bat F Not yet recruiting
Marseille, France, 13385
Contact: Olivier BLIN, MD    +33 (0) 491 387 563    olivier.blin@ap-hm.fr   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Danone Institute International
  More Information

Responsible Party: Dardaine /General representative, Danone Institute International
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00923039     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NU 304
First Submitted: June 17, 2009
First Posted: June 18, 2009
Last Update Posted: June 18, 2009
Last Verified: June 2009

Keywords provided by Danone Institute International:
The early origin of cardiovascular disease

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases