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Shoulder Proprioception Following Open and Arthroscopic Instability Repair

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00889109
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified April 2009 by Sheba Medical Center.
Recruitment status was:  Not yet recruiting
First Posted : April 28, 2009
Last Update Posted : April 28, 2009
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Sheba Medical Center

Brief Summary:

Shoulder dislocations are common and may result in functionally disabling instability. Disruption of the shoulder capsuloligamentous complex during shoulder dislocation is related to poor proprioceptive and stabilizing capabilities of the joint. It has been demonstrated that surgical restoration of the normal glenohumeral capsular tensioning improves the proprioceptive capability of the shoulder and plays an important roll in restoring shoulder stability.

Several studies compared the proprioceptive capabilities of the shoulder between different surgical procedures, however only few have used the "dynamic unrestricted 3-dimensional arm movement model" that has been shown to be more appropriate for assessment of glenohumeral proprioception. To our knowledge, no previous study has compared proprioception measures of the glenohumeral joint following arthroscopic versus open repair for anterior shoulder instability, using the 3-dimensional unrestricted arm movement model.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Shoulder Proprioception Open Capsular Shift Arthroscopic Bankart Repair Unrestricted Arm Movement Other: Three dimensional unrestricted arm movements

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 45 participants
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Proprioception of the Glenohumeral Joint Following Open and Arthroscopic Repair for Anterior Shoulder Instability
Study Start Date : July 2009
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2009

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Balance Problems
U.S. FDA Resources

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
1
Open Capsular Shift
Other: Three dimensional unrestricted arm movements
The subjects will carry out three dimensional unrestricted arm movements. The subjects' movements will be recorded by optoelectronic infrared cameras and software. Assessment of smoothness parameters of subjects' movements will allow discriminating between subjects with intact or impaired proprioception.
2
Arthroscopic Bankart Repair
Other: Three dimensional unrestricted arm movements
The subjects will carry out three dimensional unrestricted arm movements. The subjects' movements will be recorded by optoelectronic infrared cameras and software. Assessment of smoothness parameters of subjects' movements will allow discriminating between subjects with intact or impaired proprioception.
3
Healthy controls
Other: Three dimensional unrestricted arm movements
The subjects will carry out three dimensional unrestricted arm movements. The subjects' movements will be recorded by optoelectronic infrared cameras and software. Assessment of smoothness parameters of subjects' movements will allow discriminating between subjects with intact or impaired proprioception.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Assessment of smoothness parameters of subjects' shoulder movements. [ Time Frame: At least 1 year following surgical repair for anterior shoulder instability ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
All patients treated in our shoulder outpatients clinic will be candidates for inclusion in this study.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients who are at least one year after a single operation for anterior shoulder instability of their dominant arm
  • control subjects will be healthy volunteers with no history of shoulder complaints selected to match the age and gender of subjects

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Neurological impairment involving the upper extremities
  • Instability or recurrent dislocation of the operated shoulder
  • Another surgery of the dominant extremity besides the single stabilization procedure

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00889109


Contacts
Contact: Ofir Uri, M.D 972-52-4262285 ofiruri@gmail.com

Locations
Israel
Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel Not yet recruiting
Tel Aviv, Israel, 69978
Contact: Dario Liebermann, PhD.       dlieberm@post.tau.ac.il   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Sheba Medical Center
Investigators
Study Director: Dario Liebermann, PhD. Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Study Chair: Moshe Peri (Pritsch), M.D The Shoulder Surgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Dr. Ariel Oran M.D, The Shoulder Surgery Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00889109     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SHEBA-09-7068-AO-CTIL
First Posted: April 28, 2009    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 28, 2009
Last Verified: April 2009