ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Pilot Project: Fast Whole-body Spect Scanning to Improve the Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Diagnosed Cancer

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00824213
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 16, 2009
Last Update Posted : March 3, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of British Columbia

Brief Summary:

The investigators propose to investigate the performance of the image reconstruction software with resolution recovery correction for bone SPECT studies. The investigators estimate that in only 30 minutes, using this new technique of collimator de-blurring, one could perform a fully 3-dimensional SPECT whole-body bone study, essentially obviating the necessity for doing planar bone studies.

In the scope of the proposed project, the investigators group aims to test the hypothesis that one can perform a Tc-99m whole-body SPECT study in the same time as a regular routine planar bone study, with greater localization accuracy, and greater lesion detection.

To establish a "gold standard" necessary to assess the performance of the SPECT bone scans, the investigators will compare number of malignant lesions detected in patients who are proven to have metastatic skeletal bone lesions on PET F-18 whole-body scans, with whole-body Tc-99m SPECT lesions. The investigators also propose to compare the detection of SPECT scans with standard planar bone scans. This will allow for two major comparisons (a) the accuracy of SPECT bone studies compared to planar bone studies, and (b) the accuracy of SPECT bone scans compared to F-18 PET studies. Most prior studies purporting to show the superiority of F-18 bone scans to Tc-99 bone scans were done only against either planar scans or a combination of planar scans and partial SPECT studies over the spine. We anticipate that F-18 bone scans, due to the higher counting statistics of PET agents, will show more lesions than SPECT, but the exact increase in sensitivity has never been compared to whole-body SPECT scans.


Condition or disease
Bone Metastases

  Show Detailed Description

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 50 participants
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Pilot Project: Fast Whole-body Spect Scanning to Improve the Detection of Bone Metastases in Patients With Diagnosed Cancer
Study Start Date : January 2009
Actual Primary Completion Date : August 10, 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : August 10, 2016

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Nuclear Scans





Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Over the last 3-4 months, 60 anonymized patient studies were acquired using concurrent acquisition protocol with 20s, 15s, 10s, and 5s per view and with a total of 64 views (32 views/head). The data from these studies will be used to optimize the reconstruction process and establish the definitive reconstruction parameters to be used in the current study.

We plan to accrue a total of 25 subjects with suspected bone metastases who will undergo planar bone scintigraphy, bone SPECT and a Na18F whole-body bone PET scan.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with a prior history of prostate cancer and
  • clinically suspected bone metastases based on symptoms, radiological examinations or abnormal biochemistry results

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to consent to participate in the research study.
  • Inability to lie supine for a period of at least 45 minutes.
  • Inability to travel to the examination site to undergo the PET/CT examination.
  • ECOG/WHO performance status ≥ 2

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00824213


Locations
Canada, British Columbia
Lions Gate Hospital
North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V7L 2L7
British Columbia Cancer Agency
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V5Z 1L3
Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V5Z 3P1
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of British Columbia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Anna Celler, PhD University of British Columbia
Study Director: Philip Cohen University of British Columbia
Study Director: Francois Benard University of British Columbia

Responsible Party: Dr. Anna Celler, University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00824213     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H08-01640
First Posted: January 16, 2009    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 3, 2017
Last Verified: March 2017

Keywords provided by University of British Columbia:
Whole Body SPECT imaging

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Neoplasm Metastasis
Bone Neoplasms
Bone Marrow Diseases
Neoplastic Processes
Neoplasms
Pathologic Processes
Neoplasms by Site
Bone Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Hematologic Diseases