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Impact of Two Methods of Listening to Music During Exercise on Perceived Exertion and Overall Physical Activity

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00804700
First Posted: December 9, 2008
Last Update Posted: April 23, 2010
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
Georgetown University
  Purpose
The purpose of the study is to compare two different methods of listening to music while performing aerobic exercise: synchronous music listening vs. asynchronous music listening. Synchronous music listening while exercising is a learned activity where the participant moves his or her body in synchrony with the beat of the music, similar to dancing or to participating in a group exercise (aerobics) class. Our hypothesis is that synchronous music listening reduces the level of perceived exertion to the exercise and motivates the subject to exercise more often. This study randomly assigns 46 subjects, age 20-55 years old to either a control group of listening to their own favorite music in an asynchronous fashion or to an intervention group of listening to prepared music in a synchronous fashion over a six week period.

Condition Intervention
Sedentary Lifestyle Behavioral: Active teaching in synchronous listening to music while exercising

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Impact of Two Methods of Listening to Music During Exercise on Perceived Exertion and Overall Physical Activity

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Georgetown University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) from baseline to final test at 6 weeks intervention [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Difference in exercise-related energy expenditure over six weeks between to intervention and control groups [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]

Estimated Enrollment: 46
Study Start Date: December 2008
Study Completion Date: June 2009
Primary Completion Date: June 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Control Group
Subjects will be given a 60 minute lecture on the benefits of regular exercise and how music can enhance the exercise experience. Subjects will be individually instructed how to use the Precor elliptical trainer at the Yates fitness center while listening to music. Subjects are instructed to exercise using the elliptical trainer for periods of 45 -55 minutes at a time as frequently as they like with a minimum frequency of once per week. Subjects will also be encouraged to exercise regularly by walking, jogging or engaging in other forms of physical activity during the intervention period. A fitness attendant will be on hand to supervise their exercise activity, but will not give specific advice how to exercise, other than to make sure they are exercising safely.
Behavioral: Active teaching in synchronous listening to music while exercising
Subjects will be instructed to exercise while listening to four audio tutorials that are stored on their MP-3 player. These tutorials guide the subject on how to synchronize his or her body movements to the beat of the music.
Experimental: Intervention Arm
Subjects will be instructed to exercise while listening to four audio tutorials that are stored on their MP-3 player. These tutorials guide the subject on how to synchronize his or her body movements to the beat of the music.
Behavioral: Active teaching in synchronous listening to music while exercising
Subjects will be instructed to exercise while listening to four audio tutorials that are stored on their MP-3 player. These tutorials guide the subject on how to synchronize his or her body movements to the beat of the music.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years to 55 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adult employees of Georgetown University (age 20-55) who listen to music while exercising.

Exclusion Criteria::

  • A major medical condition that would prevent the participant from undertaking regular exercise
  • The use of beta blocker medication
  • Participation in varsity sports
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00804700


Locations
United States, District of Columbia
Georgetown University
Washington DC, District of Columbia, United States, 20007
Sponsors and Collaborators
Georgetown University
  More Information

Responsible Party: Rebecca Over, DO, Georgetown University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00804700     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2008-316
First Submitted: December 8, 2008
First Posted: December 9, 2008
Last Update Posted: April 23, 2010
Last Verified: December 2008

Keywords provided by Georgetown University:
synchronous
exercise
music
heartbeat
tunes