We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Effects of Intravenous Lidocaine on Transperitoneal Laparoscopic Urological Surgery

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00789620
First Posted: November 13, 2008
Last Update Posted: March 24, 2011
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
  Purpose
Effective perioperative analgesia is the key to postoperative rehabilitation. An intriguing body of evidence suggests that short-term administration of intravenous lidocaine may produce pain relief that far exceeds both the duration of infusion and the half-life of the drug. When pain relief is provided, concomitant anal-gesic medication can be reduced, side effects from pain relieving medication minimized with a potential for a more rapid postoperative recovery and less complications. IV application of lidocaine should de-crease the duration of bowel dysfunction. We hypothesise that i.v. application of lidocaine in a standard antiarrythmic dose can significantly improve acute rehabilitation after laparoscopic urological surgery and so shorten the hospital stay (primary outcome). We expect that the intraoperative inflammatory response can significantly be reduced.

Condition Intervention Phase
Pain Fatigue Drug: lidocaine Drug: placebo Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Effects of Intravenous Lidocaine on Transperitoneal Laparoscopic Urological Surgery: A Prospective, Randomised, Placebo Controlled, Double-blind, Phase III Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University Hospital Inselspital, Berne:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Hospital stay [ Time Frame: end of hospitalisation ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • change in pain score [ Time Frame: 2 and 4 h postop and 3*/d on day 1 and 2 ]
  • changes in fatigue score [ Time Frame: 2 and 4 h postop and 3*/d on day 1 and 2 ]
  • PONV [ Time Frame: 2 and 4 h postop and 3*/d on day 1 and 2 ]
  • time to first episode of flatus and defecation [ Time Frame: 2 and 4 h postop and 3*/d on day 1 and 2 ]
  • changes in metabolic and inflammatory responses (cortisol, glc, CRP and procalcitonin) [ Time Frame: preoperatively and on day 1 and 2 in the morning ]

Estimated Enrollment: 76
Study Start Date: November 2008
Study Completion Date: March 2011
Primary Completion Date: March 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1
Lidocaine 1% administrated as a bolus of 1.5 mg/kg, then intraoperative 2mg/kg/h and postoperative 1.3mg/kg/h during 24 h
Drug: lidocaine
1.5 mg/kg as Bolus intraoperative: 2 mg/kg/h postoperative: 1.3mg/kg/h during 24h
Placebo Comparator: 2
NaCl 0.9% as a bolus 1.5mg/kg, then intraoperative 2mg/kg/h and postoperative 1.3mg/kg/h during 24h
Drug: placebo
Bolus 0.15 ml/kg NaCl 0.9% NaCl 0.2 ml/kg/h Perfusor NaCl 0.9% 0.13 ml/kg/h Perfusor

Detailed Description:

Effective perioperative analgesia is the key to postoperative rehabilitation. It has been suggested that a decrease in postoperative pain and opioid use ameliorates the return of normal bowel function after general surgery. Conventional analgesic treatment involves the use of intravenous, oral and transdermal formulations of drugs. Repetitive administration is required for sustained pain relief. Common side effects (postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative ileus) of these analgesics may have a detrimental effect on postoperative recovery and led to a prolonged hospital stay. An intriguing body of evidence suggests that short-term administration of intravenous lidocaine may produce pain relief that by far exceeds both the duration of the infusion and the half-life of the drug thus reducing concomitant analgesic medication can be reduced and its side effects enabling a more rapid postoperative recovery with less complications. Lidocaine is a commonly used local anesthetic and an antiarrythmic agent. It has been shown to preserve neuroelectric function in animal experiments. Intraoperative administration of lidocaine in a standard antiarrythmic dose has been shown to decrease the occurrence of cognitive dysfunction in the early postoperative period after coronary artery bypass surgery. Lidocaine can induce a significant re-duction of several components of chronic pain in patients with poststroke or spinal cord injury related pain. Sodium channel blockers (e.g. lidocaine) are approved for intravenous administration in the treat-ment of neuropathic pain states. In addition lidocaine has anti-inflammatory properties and preclinical studies have suggested antihyperalgesic effects on the peripheral and central nervous system. Lidocaine decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhaled anesthetics and has been used clinically to reduce the requirements for other anesthetic drugs. IV application of lidocaine is said to decrease the duration of bowel dysfunction and postoperative pain intensity.

We hypothesise that i.v. application of lidocaine in a standard antiarrythmic dose can significantly improve acute rehabilitation after laparoscopic urological surgery and so shorten the hospital stay. We expect that the intraoperative inflammatory response can significantly be reduced.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Written informed consent
  • ASA 1 to 3
  • Laparoscopic transperitoneal urological surgery

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Liver insufficiency
  • Steroid therapy
  • Chronic opioid therapy
  • Allergy to lidocaine
  • Pre-existing disorder of the gastrointestinal tract
  • AV-block II-III, sinusbradycardia, heart insufficiency, long QT-syndrome
  • Pregnancy
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00789620


Locations
Switzerland
Dep. of Urology, Bern University Hospital
Bern, Switzerland, 3010
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Patrick Y Wüthrich, MD Dep. of Anesthesiology and pain service, Bern University Hospital
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Patrick Y Wüthrich MD, Dep. of anesthesiology and pain service, Bern University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00789620     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: KEK_155_08
First Submitted: November 11, 2008
First Posted: November 13, 2008
Last Update Posted: March 24, 2011
Last Verified: March 2011

Keywords provided by University Hospital Inselspital, Berne:
intravenous lidocaine
laparoscopic urological surgery
hospital stay
pain
fatigue
length of stay

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Fatigue
Signs and Symptoms
Lidocaine
Anesthetics, Local
Anesthetics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Blockers
Sodium Channel Blockers
Membrane Transport Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action