We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

American Ginseng Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis Related Fatigue

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00754832
First Posted: September 18, 2008
Last Update Posted: January 24, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ruth Whitham, Oregon Health and Science University
  Purpose
This research project will determine the safety and tolerability of ginseng in subjects with MS and will gather preliminary data on the efficacy of ginseng vs placebo for the treatment of MS fatigue.

Condition Intervention Phase
Multiple Sclerosis Drug: American ginseng extract HT-1001 Drug: placebo Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Double-blinded, Placebo-controlled Crossover Pilot Study of American Ginseng Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis Related Fatigue

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Ruth Whitham, Oregon Health and Science University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Fatigue Severity Scale [ Time Frame: after 6 weeks of intervention ]
    The Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS)is a self-administered instrument that includes 9 items rated on a 7-point scale, measuring fatigue severity. The subject is asked to score each statement, based on how the statement applied to them over the preceding week. The fatigue severity score is the average of the scores on the 9 questions; scores range from 1-7, with lower scores indicating less fatigue.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Modified Fatigue Impact Scale [ Time Frame: 6 weeks of intervention ]
    21 item scale, score range 0-84, lower scores indicate less fatigue

  • Realtime Digital Fatigue Score [ Time Frame: 6 weeks of intervention ]
    fatigue scored on 0-10 scale with higher scores indicating more fatigue


Enrollment: 56
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: March 2011
Primary Completion Date: September 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
Period 1 with Ginseng therapy intervention; Washout Period with no drug; Period 2 with placebo
Drug: American ginseng extract HT-1001
Ginseng HT-1001 was dosed at 100 mg orally per day initially, increased after one week to 200 mg per day, then further increased the next week to 400 mg per day as tolerated. Subjects were then maintained on 400 mg per day or the maximum tolerated dose for the remainder of the 6 week treatment period.
Drug: placebo
Placebo capsules were identical to the study drug and were dose escalated to match the study drug. Subjects were maintained on placebo capsules for the remainder of the 6 week treatment period.
Other Name: placebo (matched capsules to ginseng drug)
Experimental: 2
Period 1 with placebo; Washout period with no drug; Period 2 with ginseng therapy intervention
Drug: American ginseng extract HT-1001
Ginseng HT-1001 was dosed at 100 mg orally per day initially, increased after one week to 200 mg per day, then further increased the next week to 400 mg per day as tolerated. Subjects were then maintained on 400 mg per day or the maximum tolerated dose for the remainder of the 6 week treatment period.
Drug: placebo
Placebo capsules were identical to the study drug and were dose escalated to match the study drug. Subjects were maintained on placebo capsules for the remainder of the 6 week treatment period.
Other Name: placebo (matched capsules to ginseng drug)

Detailed Description:

Fatigue is a major cause of disability in MS and is associated with a reduced quality of life. Treatment options for MS fatigue include central nervous system stimulants and amantadine. These medications are of limited efficacy, are often poorly tolerated, and can be expensive. Ginseng may represent a novel approach to treating MS fatigue. Ginseng has been tested in clinical trials for its ability to improve mental alertness and fatigue. However, there have been no published clinical trials addressing the effects of ginseng in subjects with MS, even though many people with MS use ginseng and report deriving benefit from it.

This double-blinded, placebo controlled crossover pilot study will determine the safety and tolerability of ginseng in subjects with MS and will gather preliminary data on the efficacy of ginseng vs. placebo for the treatment of MS fatigue. Additionally, the project will collect information on the impact of ginseng on cognition, stress, actigraphy, salivary cortisol, differential cytokine response, and quality of life.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • MS as diagnosed by the McDonald criteria
  • Complaint of fatigue that has been persistent for at least 2 months
  • FSS score of 4 or greater;
  • Age 18-70.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Use of ginseng or stimulants in the prior 6 weeks
  • Acute treatment with glucocorticoids in the prior 6 weeks
  • BDI >31
  • Significant MS exacerbation in prior 30 days
  • Diabetes
  • Uncontrolled hypertension
  • Other serious medical disease, pregnancy or breastfeeding
  • Breast disease
  • Abnormal bleeding or clotting disorder
  • Current use of warfarin, albendazole, nifedipine, digoxin, bumetadine, selegiline, isocarboxazid, or phenelzine
  • Current use of lasix for poorly controlled hypertension or congestive heart failure
  • Current drug or alcohol abuse; inability to complete the self report forms
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00754832


Locations
United States, Oregon
Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, Oregon, United States, 97239
Sponsors and Collaborators
Oregon Health and Science University
National Multiple Sclerosis Society
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ruth Whitham, M.D. Oregon Health and Science University
  More Information

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Ruth Whitham, Professor of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00754832     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1357
First Submitted: September 16, 2008
First Posted: September 18, 2008
Results First Submitted: September 9, 2011
Results First Posted: January 24, 2012
Last Update Posted: January 24, 2012
Last Verified: January 2012

Keywords provided by Ruth Whitham, Oregon Health and Science University:
Multiple sclerosis
fatigue
ginseng

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis
Fatigue
Pathologic Processes
Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Nervous System Diseases
Demyelinating Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms