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The Relationship of Abdominal Circumference and Trunk Length With the Level of Spinal Anesthesia in Obstetric Patients

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00748176
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 8, 2008
Last Update Posted : December 15, 2009
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Taiwan University Hospital

Brief Summary:
The body shape might have influence on the spinal level. In this research we plan to investigate the relationship of abdominal circumference, trunk length and the level of spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients during Cesarean section.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Obstetrics for C/S Procedure: spinal anesthesia

Detailed Description:
The level of spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients had been investigated in several studies. Increased cephalad spread of local anesthetics had been demonstrated with increased intra-abdominal pressure, changes in anteroposterior spinal curves and lumbar lordosis. Theoretically the body shape might have contribution to the above factors and might have influence on the spinal level. In this research we plan to investigate the relationship of abdominal circumference, trunk length and the level of spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients during Cesarean section. Only those C/S patients indicated and scheduled for spinal anesthesia will be observed. The spinal anesthesia will be performed as routine practice. This study will not change the clinical plan in any aspect. We will only passively record the abdominal circumference, trunk length and the level of spinal anesthesia and calculate the correlation between them.

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 30 participants
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: The Relationship of Abdominal Circumference and Trunk Length With the Level of Spinal Anesthesia in Obstetric Patients
Study Start Date : July 2008
Actual Primary Completion Date : October 2009
Actual Study Completion Date : October 2009

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Anesthesia
U.S. FDA Resources

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
A Procedure: spinal anesthesia
spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine




Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 45 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Obstetric patients for C/S
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Obstetric patients for C/S

Exclusion Criteria:

  • With major systemic diseases

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00748176


Locations
Taiwan
National Taiwan University Hospital
Taipei, Taiwan
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Taiwan University Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Hui-Hsun Huang Department of anesthesiology, National Taiwan University Hospital

Responsible Party: Hui-Hsun Huang, Visiting Staff, Department of Anesthesiology, National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00748176     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 200805027R
First Posted: September 8, 2008    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 15, 2009
Last Verified: December 2009

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anesthetics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs