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Non-Invasive Brain Signal Training to Induce Motor Control Recovery After Stroke

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Janis Daly, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00746525
First received: September 3, 2008
Last updated: January 19, 2017
Last verified: January 2017
  Purpose
The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the benefits of combination motor learning training and brain computer interface training for restoring arm function in people with stroke. Our aim was to determine whether the surface-acquired brain signal (electroencephalography (EEG)) can feasibly be used as a neural feedback system to drive more normal motor function in stroke survivors.

Condition Intervention
Stroke Other: Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) Other: Motor learning Other: Brain computer interface (BCI) training

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: No masking
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Non-Invasive Brain Signal Training to Induce Motor Control Recovery After Stroke

Further study details as provided by Janis Daly, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • EEG (electroencephalography) [ Time Frame: Week 12 ]
    measures brain activity during a specified movement task


Enrollment: 8
Study Start Date: September 2008
Study Completion Date: June 2016
Primary Completion Date: June 2016 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Brain Computer Interface Training Stroke Experimental Group
Individuals in the stroke experimental group received treatment with BCI, FES, and motor learning targeted at their upper extremity motor deficits following stroke.
Other: Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES)
FES is a technique that electrically stimulates a muscle in a comfortable manner in order to contract the muscle. It uses an electrode placed on the surface of the skin. This study will use BCI, FES, and motor learning interventions to address upper extremity motor deficits following stroke.
Other: Motor learning
Motor learning is an exercise that uses movements needed for everyday tasks such as picking up a glass or opening a book. This study will use BCI, FES, and motor learning interventions to address upper extremity motor deficits following stroke.
Other: Brain computer interface (BCI) training
BCI training uses signals produced by the brain to help individuals with stroke move their weak arm. This study will use BCI, FES and motor learning interventions to address upper extremity motor deficits following stroke.

Detailed Description:

The financial burden and human suffering are devastating after stroke due to the lack of rehabilitation protocols that can restore normal brain and motor function. Conventional treatment does not restore normal motor function to many stroke survivors. The majority of available treatments are directed at the peripheral nervous system (arms/legs). Since stroke occurs in the brain and results in brain damage and dysfunction, a more direct approach may be to re-train the brain by directly treating the activation of brain signals that control movement.

The purposes of this study are to determine if motor learning, functional electrical stimulation (FES), and brain computer interface (BCI) training are beneficial for restoring arm function in people who have had a stroke, and to determine if the surface-acquired brain signal [electroencephalography (EEG)] can be re-trained to provide more normal motor function in stroke survivors. The primary purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of the motor learning tasks in stroke recovery.

In the study, scientists will use two different and complimentary brain signal training components to restore more normal motor control of a motor task (elbow, wrist, or finger movement task). Specifically targeting, invoking, and training the surface-acquired EEG brain signal, and integrating brain signal training into motor learning training of upper limb motor tasks, may result in greater motor restoration when compared to a comprehensive motor learning intervention without EEG brain signal training.

Eight people who had a stroke were enrolled in the experimental group. They received brain signal training and comprehensive motor learning based therapy.

An additional 5 healthy adults were enrolled in order to study their ability to acquire brain signal control and the characteristics of their brain signal during the tasks that the stroke participants attempted.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   22 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • medically stable and >/= 6 months post stroke
  • difficulty using upper limb for functional tasks
  • >21 years old

Exclusion Criteria:

  • chronic, progressive medical condition (i.e. Parkinson's disease)
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00746525

Locations
United States, Florida
Malcom Randall VA Medical Center
Gainesville, Florida, United States, 32608
Sponsors and Collaborators
Louis Stokes VA Medical Center
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Janis J Daly, PhD, MS Malcom Randall VA Medical Center
  More Information

Responsible Party: Janis Daly, Director, Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00746525     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01NS063275 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
Study First Received: September 3, 2008
Last Updated: January 19, 2017

Keywords provided by Janis Daly, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System:
stroke
motor learning
rehabilitation of upper extremity
functional electrical stimulation
FES
brain computer interface
BCI
coordination
motor control

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stroke
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 16, 2017