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High-fidelity Simulation in Health Care Education

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified June 2010 by National Taiwan University Hospital.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00690144
First received: May 28, 2008
Last updated: June 28, 2010
Last verified: June 2010
  Purpose
The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of high-fidelity simulation in health care education is an effective training and evaluation model.

Condition Intervention
Healthy
Device: High-fidelity high-fidelity mannequin simulator (SimMan, Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway).

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Prospective Study Focusing on Impact of High-fidelity Simulation in Health Care Education

Further study details as provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • performance of clinical reasoning and skills in simulated settings [ Time Frame: before and after the simulation-based training ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • clinical performance of reasoning and skills [ Time Frame: before and after the simulation-based training ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 500
Study Start Date: July 2007
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2011
Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: simulation group
the trainees in the simulation group receive simulation-based training
Device: High-fidelity high-fidelity mannequin simulator (SimMan, Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway).
Critical care training using high-fidelity simulation. The case scenarios were simulated by a high-fidelity mannequin simulator (SimMan, Laerdal, Stavanger, Norway).

Detailed Description:
High-fidelity simulation has many advantages in medical education. Simulation-based critical care training is especially valuable due to error-prone work settings and the high cost of patient adverse events. This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of implementing the high-fidelity simulation in critical care training, and the feasibility of high-fidelity simulation as an evaluation tool.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • healthcare trainees, including medical students, nursing students, residents, nursing staff and emergency medical technicians.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • any trainees unwilling to receive simulation-based training
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00690144

Locations
Taiwan
National Taiwan University Hospital
Taipei, Taiwan
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Taiwan University Hospital
Investigators
Study Director: Matthew Huei-Ming Ma, MD, PhD National Taiwan University Hospital
  More Information

Responsible Party: Matthew Huei-Ming Ma, MD, PhD, National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00690144     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 200803078R 
Study First Received: May 28, 2008
Last Updated: June 28, 2010
Health Authority: Taiwan: Department of Health

Keywords provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:
simulation
medical education
performance of clinical reasoning and skills

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on December 06, 2016