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Venous Thrombosis in Turner Syndrome

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00594763
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified January 2008 by University of Aarhus.
Recruitment status was:  Active, not recruiting
First Posted : January 16, 2008
Last Update Posted : February 1, 2008
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Aarhus

Brief Summary:
In the literature, cases of thrombosis in the venous system have been described in girls and women with Turner syndrome. By screening a group of women with Turner syndrome, the researchers wish to find out if this condition is more frequent in this patient population.

Condition or disease
Thromboembolic Disease

Detailed Description:
In the literature cases of thrombosis in the venous system has been described in girls and women with Turner syndrome. By screening a group of women with Turner syndrome we wish to find out if this condition is more frequent in this patient population. Participants are examined with screening blood tests evaluating thromboembolic disturbances.

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: The Risk of Venous Thrombosis in Women With Turner Syndrome
Study Start Date : June 2006
Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 2008
Estimated Study Completion Date : April 2008


Group/Cohort
TS
Women with Turner syndrome



Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA
Blood


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Women with Turner syndrome
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Turner syndrome verified by karyotyping
  • Aged 18 or above

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Malignant disease
  • Treatment with anticoagulants

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To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00594763


Locations
Denmark
Medical Department M (Endocrinology and Diabetes), Aarhus University Hospital
Aarhus, Aarhus C, Denmark, 8000
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Aarhus
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jens Sandahl Christiansen, MD, dr.med, professor Medical Department of Endocrinology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark

Responsible Party: Jens Sandahl Christiansen, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00594763     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 20050045
First Posted: January 16, 2008    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 1, 2008
Last Verified: January 2008

Keywords provided by University of Aarhus:
Turner syndrome
Thromboembolic disease

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Thrombosis
Venous Thrombosis
Turner Syndrome
Gonadal Dysgenesis
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency
Thromboembolism
Embolism and Thrombosis
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Disorders of Sex Development
Urogenital Abnormalities
Sex Chromosome Disorders of Sex Development
Heart Defects, Congenital
Cardiovascular Abnormalities
Heart Diseases
Congenital Abnormalities
Sex Chromosome Disorders
Chromosome Disorders
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Gonadal Disorders
Endocrine System Diseases
Ovarian Diseases
Adnexal Diseases
Genital Diseases, Female