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Comparison of Suturing and Packing of Drained Abscesses

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00465049
First Posted: April 24, 2007
Last Update Posted: October 22, 2012
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Adam Singer, Stony Brook University
  Purpose
The standard treatment for skin abscesses in drainage followed by packing to prevent premature closure and reaccumulation of pus. Studies from the 1950s and later conducted outside of the US suggest that when drained abscesses are drained and sutured closed they actually heal faster without complications. The current study compares the time to healing and scar formation when drained abscesses are packed or sutured.

Condition Intervention Phase
Cutanoeus Abscesses Other: PRIMARY CLOSRE Other: SECONDARY CLOSURE Other: SPONTANEOUS HALING Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Primary vs. Secondary Closure of Cutaneous Abscesses After I&D: A RCT

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Adam Singer, Stony Brook University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Days to healing. [ Time Frame: 1 week ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Need for subsequent drainage, scar appearance. [ Time Frame: 1 week ]

Estimated Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: January 2007
Study Completion Date: February 2012
Primary Completion Date: January 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: primary closure
suture after I&D
Other: PRIMARY CLOSRE
SUTURE
Placebo Comparator: SECONDARY CLOSURE
LEAVE TO HEAL BY SECONDARY INTENTIN AFTER I&D
Other: SECONDARY CLOSURE
ALLOW TO HEAL SPONTANEOUSLY
Other: SPONTANEOUS HALING
SECONDARY HEALING AFTER I&D

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 85 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Non complicated abscesses

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Fever,
  • Immunocompromise,
  • Cellulitis,
  • Perianal and
  • Pilonidal abscesses
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00465049


Locations
United States, New York
Stony Brook University Hospital
Stony Brook, New York, United States, 11794
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stony Brook University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Adam J Singer, MD Stony Brook University
  More Information

Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Adam Singer, RESEARCH DIRECTOR, Stony Brook University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00465049     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: CORIHS 2007-5819
First Submitted: April 23, 2007
First Posted: April 24, 2007
Last Update Posted: October 22, 2012
Last Verified: October 2012

Keywords provided by Adam Singer, Stony Brook University:
abscess, primary closure, secondary closure

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Abscess
Suppuration
Infection
Inflammation
Pathologic Processes


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