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Advanced Grandparental Age as a Risk Factor for Autism

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00464477
First Posted: April 23, 2007
Last Update Posted: November 7, 2007
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University of Mississippi Medical Center
  Purpose

The Division of Medical Genetics at the University of Mississippi Medical Center is recruiting parents of children with a pervasive developmental disorder (including autism, autistic spectrum disorder, PDD-NOS, Asperger syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and Rett syndrome) to participate in a study to help determine potential causes of the increasing prevalence of these disorders. The study is being conducted using an anonymous on-line survey available to parents through a secure link.

The study consists of approximately 90 questions about the affected child, siblings, parents, and grandparents, which will take roughly 10-15 minutes to complete. Several families will also be invited to participate in a phone interview. Both the survey and the phone interview are conducted using a self-designated code to protect anonymity and patient privacy. No identifying information such as name, date of birth, address, or phone number will be asked. Only questions regarding the year of birth of family members will be asked.


Condition
Autistic Disorder Pervasive Developmental Disorder Asperger Syndrome Childhood Disintegrative Disorder Rett Syndrome

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Advanced Grandparental Age as a Risk Factor for Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:

Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: June 2007
Study Completion Date: October 2007
Detailed Description:
Autism is a genetically heterogeneous entity. Although numerous studies have demonstrated a strong genetic basis, no clear etiology has been identified to date. Recently, two studies have demonstrated an increased risk of autism in children born to fathers over the age of 40. However, given the large male-to-female predominance of autism, it is likely that new mutations on the X chromosome account for a significant number of affected cases. Due to the maternal origin of the X chromosome in males, we hypothesize that advanced maternal-grandpaternal age may also be a risk factor for autism. Precedence for this theory exists with other X-linked disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Rett syndrome. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that maternal psychiatric illness, but not paternal psychiatric illness, is more prevalent among parents of children with autism. Using anonymous surveys of families with autistic children, we seek to identify the ages of grandparents at the time the parents were born in order to determine if advanced maternal-grandpaternal age is associated with an increased risk for autism when adjusted for advanced maternal and paternal age. Additionally, we will seek out sister-pairs in order to identify any statistical significance between the ages of the maternal grandfather at delivery of each sister. If advanced maternal-grandpaternal age is, in fact, a risk factor, it would help direct molecular researchers towards genes on the X chromosome as potential etiologies for autism. Also, further study of potential mutagenic exposures in the environment of grandparents may help elucidate the reason for the increasing incidence of autism in recent decades.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Patients with any pervasive developmental disorder.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals of any age with autism, autistic disorder, autistic spectrum disorder, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder, PDD-NOS, Rett syndrome, or Childhood disintegrative disorder
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00464477


Locations
United States, Mississippi
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, Mississippi, United States, 39216
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Omar Abdul-Rahman, MD University of Mississippi Medical Center
  More Information

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00464477     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2007-0023
First Submitted: April 20, 2007
First Posted: April 23, 2007
Last Update Posted: November 7, 2007
Last Verified: November 2007

Keywords provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:
Autism
Autistic disorder
Pervasive developmental disorder
Asperger syndrome
Childhood disintegrative disorder
Rett syndrome

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Developmental Disabilities
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Disease
Syndrome
Autistic Disorder
Rett Syndrome
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Asperger Syndrome
Pathologic Processes
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Retardation, X-Linked
Intellectual Disability
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Genetic Diseases, X-Linked
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System