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The Effect of a Short Educational Program on Young Women's Knowledge and Beliefs About Osteoporosis

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00464412
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 23, 2007
Last Update Posted : May 9, 2007
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Roanoke College
Information provided by:
Valdosta State University

Brief Summary:
The purpose of the study is to determine the effect of a short educational program on young women's knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis. They hypothesis is that following the intervention women who receive the educational program will have greater knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Osteoporosis Behavioral: Education Phase 1

Detailed Description:
Objective. To determine the effect of a short osteoporosis educational program on young women’s knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis. Methods. Ten college physical activity classes enrolling 133 predominantly Caucasian women (age range 18 to 21 years) were randomized to an osteoporosis educational program or control. Knowledge and beliefs about osteoporosis were assessed at baseline and at one week and three weeks following the intervention using the Multiple Osteoporosis Prevention Survey. Knowledge was defined as the ability to identify correctly osteoporosis risk factors. Beliefs were measured with the use of a five point Likert type scale. The educational program was comprised of a lecture and printed materials developed by the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Chi-square and analysis of variance evaluated for between group differences. Alpha was set at 0.05.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 135 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Official Title: The Effect of a Short Educational Program on Young Women's Knowledge and Beliefs About Osteoporosis
Study Start Date : January 2006
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2006

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Osteoporosis
U.S. FDA Resources




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Osteoporosis Knowledge [ Time Frame: 7 days and 21 days post educational intervention ]
  2. Osteoporosis Beliefs [ Time Frame: 7 days and 21 days post educational intervention ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Women enrolled in a mid-atlantic college physical activity course

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to partake in three survey's and one educational lesson

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00464412


Sponsors and Collaborators
Valdosta State University
Roanoke College
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Mark J Kasper, EdD Valdosta State University

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00464412     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1-Kasper
First Posted: April 23, 2007    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 9, 2007
Last Verified: May 2007

Keywords provided by Valdosta State University:
Osteoporosis
Knowledge
Beliefs
Education
Women

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Osteoporosis
Bone Diseases, Metabolic
Bone Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Metabolic Diseases