We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Airways Dysfunction Following WTC Dust Exposure

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00395330
First Posted: November 2, 2006
Last Update Posted: August 20, 2015
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
New York University School of Medicine
  Purpose
In the weeks following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, many patients presented to their physicians with complaints related to exposure to the debris. These included nose and throat complaints (drip, congestion, sore throat), increased GE reflux (heartburn, regurgitation, retrosternal chest burning) and respiratory symptoms (worsening cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, sleep disturbance). In addition, there was a disproportionate rate of self-reported worsening asthma symptoms in patients living in Lower New York 5-9 weeks after the attack; those with exposure to the dust cloud fared worse. The functional abnormalities of firefighters with exposures to dust at the WTC site has been recently described. However, the effects of WTC dust exposure on pulmonary function in residents and workers near the WTC site remain unclear. This study will retrospectively review the charts of all patients referred to the pulmonary function laboratory for evaluation of symptoms following exposure to WTC dust. The main objectives for this study will be to characterize the functional abnormalities in these subjects.

Condition
Pulmonary Diseases

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Ecologic or Community
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Airways Dysfunction Following WTC Dust Exposure

Further study details as provided by New York University School of Medicine:

Estimated Enrollment: 500
Study Start Date: April 2003
Study Completion Date: October 2006
Primary Completion Date: October 2006 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
study will retrospectively review the charts of all patients referred to the pulmonary function laboratory for evaluation of symptoms following exposure to WTC dust.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • age 18-80
  • referral for pulmonary function evaluation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to WTC dust

Exclusion Criteria:

  • inability to perform testing
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00395330


Sponsors and Collaborators
New York University School of Medicine
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Kenneth I Berger, MD New York University School of Medicine
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00395330     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H06-714
First Submitted: November 1, 2006
First Posted: November 2, 2006
Last Update Posted: August 20, 2015
Last Verified: August 2015

Keywords provided by New York University School of Medicine:
Respiratory Function Tests
Oscillometry
World Trade Center Disaster
Environmental Exposure
Distal Airways

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases