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Brief Intervention for Drug Abusing Adolescents

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00350909
First Posted: July 11, 2006
Last Update Posted: October 20, 2008
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
  Purpose
The purpose of this clinical trail is to evaluate the efficacy of a brief, cognitive-behavioral therapeutic intervention for adolescents reporting mild or moderate drug abuse (MMDA). This school-based initiative employs a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota researchers and the St. Paul Public Schools. This intervention aims to reduce post-treatment drug use behaviors and enhance drug-use resistant cognitions and problem-solving skills.

Condition Intervention Phase
Drug Abuse Behavioral: brief intervention (cognitive-behavioral therapy) Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Brief Intervention for Drug Abusing Students

Further study details as provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Drug use frequency and quantity at 1-, 3- and 12-months post-intervention. [ Time Frame: 1 year post treatment ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • HIV and sexual risk behaviors at the same time period. [ Time Frame: 1 year post treatment ]

Enrollment: 160
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: July 2008
Primary Completion Date: May 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
One arm was a 2-session brief intervention with both sessions involving only the adolescent. Each session was a 60 minute individual session with the counselor.
Behavioral: brief intervention (cognitive-behavioral therapy)
Consists of 60 minute individual sessions delivered with a therapist using a motivational interviewing (MI) style. Session 1 focuses on eliciting information about the students' substance use and related consequences based on the assessment, their perception of level of willingness to change, examining the cause and benefits of change using the decisional balance exercise, and discussing what goals for change the student would like to select and pursue. Session 2 reviewed the students' progress with the agreed upon goals, identifying high risk situations associated with clients difficulty in achieving the goals, discussing strategies to address barriers toward goal attainment, reviewing where the client is in the stage of change process, and negotiating either the continuation of goals or advancing to more ambitious goals of substance use reduction. Session 3 involved delivering the same MI interviewing style to the primary parent or guardian (student is not present).
Other Name: cognitive-behavioral therapy- motivational interviewing
Active Comparator: 2
The other arm was a 3-session brief intervention, with 2 sessions involving the adolescent and one session with the parent. Each of these individual sessions were 60 minutes.
Behavioral: brief intervention (cognitive-behavioral therapy)
Consists of 60 minute individual sessions delivered with a therapist using a motivational interviewing (MI) style. Session 1 focuses on eliciting information about the students' substance use and related consequences based on the assessment, their perception of level of willingness to change, examining the cause and benefits of change using the decisional balance exercise, and discussing what goals for change the student would like to select and pursue. Session 2 reviewed the students' progress with the agreed upon goals, identifying high risk situations associated with clients difficulty in achieving the goals, discussing strategies to address barriers toward goal attainment, reviewing where the client is in the stage of change process, and negotiating either the continuation of goals or advancing to more ambitious goals of substance use reduction. Session 3 involved delivering the same MI interviewing style to the primary parent or guardian (student is not present).
Other Name: cognitive-behavioral therapy- motivational interviewing

Detailed Description:

The purpose of this clinical trail is to evaluate the efficacy of a brief, cognitive-behavioral therapeutic intervention for adolescents reporting mild or moderate drug abuse (MMDA). This school-based initiative employs a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota researchers and the St. Paul Public Schools. This intervention aims to reduce post-treatment drug use behaviors and enhance drug-use resistant cognitions and problem-solving skills.

Specifically, we propose a randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral therapy on key process and outcome dimensions among school-based youth with mild-to-moderate drug abuse (MMDA). The experimental treatment is designated Brief Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (BCBI) given its theoretical foundation in stage of change theory used to coordinate modules on Rational-Emotive Therapy and Problem Solving Therapy. BCBI will be compared against a second experimental treatment that consists of BCBI and a single parent session (BCBI+P) and an assessment only condition (control). The importance of clarifying mechanisms in drug treatment research will be explored with respect to a limited number of treatment and individual factors that have emerged as promising mediating and moderating factors, such as cognitive and problem solving factors, parenting practices, and peer group influences.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 19 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. student at a local school
  2. meets DSM-IV criteria for a substance abuse disorder for at least one drug
  3. student and parent both agree to participate in the intervention study

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. meets criteria for at least one DSM-IV substance dependence disorder
  2. meets criteria for a psychotic disorder or a learning disability
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00350909


Locations
United States, Minnesota
University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, 55454
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ken C Winters, Ph.D. University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Ken Winters, ph.D., Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00350909     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0308S51681
First Submitted: July 7, 2006
First Posted: July 11, 2006
Last Update Posted: October 20, 2008
Last Verified: October 2008

Keywords provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:
drug abuse

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders