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Isolation and Characterization of Mammary Stem Cells

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00340392
First Posted: June 21, 2006
Last Update Posted: July 2, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
  Purpose

Background:

  • Cancer stem cells in breast cancer have been identified as a small population of tumor cells whose self-renewal mechanism is highly deregulated. This deregulation seems to be necessary for cancer to develop.
  • These cells can be identified by certain surface markers that overlap with markers associated with normal embryonic stem cells.

Objective: To isolate tumor stem cells using the same methods generally used to isolate human embryonic stem cells.

Eligibility:

  • Tissue samples will be obtained from the human cooperative network.
  • Samples will include normal tissues from individuals who have no opportunistic diseases and from individuals with cancer.

Design: Breast cancer stem cells will be isolated, grown in the laboratory and characterized.


Condition
Stem Cells

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Isolation and Characterization of Mammary Stem Cells

Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 400
Study Start Date: April 7, 2006
Estimated Study Completion Date: March 23, 2011
Detailed Description:

Cancers are composed of heterogeneous populations of cells with varying degrees of proliferative capacity and ability to reconstitute tumors when transplanted into nude or SCID mice.

Recently, cancer stem cells have been identified as a small population of tumor cells which possess the stem cell properties in that their self-renewal pathway is highly deregulated. This deregulation seems to be the prerequisite for the development of cancer.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

The tissue samples will come from the human cooperative network. They have their own set of criteria. We are requesting tissue samples from individuals that are normal as well as those who have cancer.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

The tissue samples will come from the human cooperative tissue network and we are asking for normal samples from individuals who don't have any opportunistic diseases.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00340392


Locations
United States, Maryland
National Cancer Institute (NCI), 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  More Information

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00340392     History of Changes
Obsolete Identifiers: NCT00900315
Other Study ID Numbers: 999906140
06-C-N140
First Submitted: June 19, 2006
First Posted: June 21, 2006
Last Update Posted: July 2, 2017
Last Verified: March 23, 2011

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Mammary Stem Cells
Breast Cancer
Cancer Stem Cells
Gene Expression Profiling