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Comparison of Stacked-Pulses Vs. Double-Pass Treatments of Facial Acne With a 1450 Nm Laser

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00306371
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 23, 2006
Last Update Posted : March 23, 2006
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Candela Corporation
Information provided by:
Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill

Brief Summary:
Acne can be treated with a mid-infrared laser. We demonstrated safety and efficacy using lower energy settings in order to make the treatments less painful

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Acne Acne Scars Device: 1450nm diode laser

Detailed Description:
Numerous light based therapies are currently being used for the treatment of acne. Non-ablative mid-infrared lasers have the advantage of decreasing inflammatory acne and improving acne scars. Specifically, the 1450 nm laser has been shown to be quite effective. However, it is associated with considerable pain at higher fluences despite topical anesthetics, especially when treating inflammatory acne. The goal of this study was to determine the possibility of using low fluence settings to treat moderate to severe acne at a more tolerable pain level without compromising treatment effectiveness.

Study Type : Observational
Enrollment : 15 participants
Observational Model: Defined Population
Observational Model: Natural History
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Comparison of Stacked-Pulses Vs. Double-Pass Treatments of Facial Acne With a 1450 Nm Laser
Study Start Date : July 2004
Study Completion Date : February 2006

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Acne





Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • acne lesion count of at least 10 inflammatory papules on each side of the face and a severity grade consistent with color photographs in the Allen & Smith grading scale of greater than or equal to grade 3 and no worse than grade 5

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Exclusion criteria included the use of oral retinoids or systemic corticosteroids within the past 6 months and the use of all prescription topical or systemic anti-acne medications 4 weeks prior to the initiation of the study

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00306371


Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Skincare physicians of Chestnut Hill
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States, 02467
Sponsors and Collaborators
Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill
Candela Corporation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Nathan S Uebelhoer, DO Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill
Study Director: Jeffrey S Dover, MD Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill
Study Chair: Kenneth A Arndt, MD Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00306371     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 20040308
WIRB study # 1056817
First Posted: March 23, 2006    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 23, 2006
Last Verified: July 2004

Keywords provided by Skincare Physicians of Chestnut Hill:
diode
laser
acne
acne scar

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Acne Vulgaris
Acneiform Eruptions
Skin Diseases
Sebaceous Gland Diseases