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New Moves - Obesity Prevention Among Adolescent Girls

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00250497
First Posted: November 8, 2005
Last Update Posted: March 22, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
  Purpose
The New Moves study will evaluate the impact of a school based program for inactive high school girls who are overweight or at risk for being overweight due to low levels of physical activity. The primary study hypothesis is that girls in the intervention schools will significantly decrease their percent body fat as compared to girls in the control schools. Secondary research hypotheses include that girls in the intervention condition will significantly increase their physical activity levels and improve the quality of their dietary intake.

Condition Intervention
Obesity Behavioral: New Moves

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: New Moves: Obesity Prevention Among Adolescent Girls

Further study details as provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Percent Body Fat [ Time Frame: Baseline and One year ]
    Measured with DEX-A at baseline and 1 year follow-up


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Level of Physical Activity [ Time Frame: One year ]
    The 3DPAR assessed the sedentary behaviors and physical activities that study participants engaged in during each half hour time block between 6 AM and midnight on the three days previous to the day of data collection. In order to complete the 3DPAR, participants were provided with a list of 65 common sedentary behaviors and physical activities and were asked to select the activity that they participated in for the majority of every 30-minute block. The number of blocks of physical activity were summed for each day and then averaged over the 3 days. Outcomes was the average # of 30 minute blocks of physical activity.

  • Fruits and Vegetables [ Time Frame: One year ]
  • Sedentary Activity [ Time Frame: One Year ]
    The 3DPAR assessed the sedentary behaviors and physical activities that study participants engaged in during each half hour time block between 6 AM and midnight on the three days previous to the day of data collection. In order to complete the 3DPAR, participants were provided with a list of 65 common sedentary behaviors and physical activities and were asked to select the activity that they participated in for the majority of every 30-minute block. The number of blocks of sedentary activity were summed for each day and then averaged over the 3 days. Outcomes was the average # of 30 minute blocks of sedentary activity per day

  • Unhealthy Weight Control Behaviors [ Time Frame: One Year ]
    Ten questions assessing use of unhealthy weight control behaviors in the past month (yes/no). Behavior categories included fasted, ate very little, took diet pills, made myself vomit, used laxatives, used diuretics, used food substitutes, skipped meals, smoked more cigarettes, and went on a diet. If a respondent reported doing any of these behaviors, they were classified as having used unhealthy weight control behaviors.

  • Body Satisfaction [ Time Frame: One year ]
    Ten questions assessing satisfaction with weight, height, and specific parts of the body; six Likert response categories.Body Satisfaction Scale Range=10-60 with higher values indicating increased body satisfaction.


Enrollment: 356
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: June 2009
Primary Completion Date: June 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: New Moves Intervention Group
The New Moves intervention is an all girls physical education class that provides a supportive environment for girls. Girls participate in noncompetitive physical activities. They also receive lessons on nutrition and social support. After the class is over, girls continue to receive intervention messages through weekly lunch meetings. Girls meet individually with a personal coach.
Behavioral: New Moves
The New Moves intervention is an all girls physical education class that provides a supportive environment for girls. Girls participate in noncompetitive physical activities. They also receive lessons on nutrition and social support. After the class is over, girls continue to receive intervention messages through weekly lunch meetings. Girls meet individually with a personal coach.
No Intervention: control group
Girls in the control group participated in an all-girls physical education class but did not receive additional components offered in the intervention such as individual coaching.

Detailed Description:

The purpose of the New Moves study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based all girls alternative to regular physical education class for inactive high school girls. New Moves uses a large-scale community randomized controlled study involving girls from six intervention schools and six control schools. The New Moves class includes physical activity, nutritional guidance, and social support within a supportive, non-competitive environment. In addition the program includes individual counseling sessions.

The primary research hypothesis is that girls in the intervention condition will significantly decrease their percent body fat as compared to girls in the control condition. Secondary research hypothesis to be tested are that girls in the intervention condition will significantly increase their level of physical activity and improve the quality of their dietary intake as compared to girls in the control condition. In addition a range of socioenvironmental, personal, and behavioral variables will be compared across conditions.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 19 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • High school girls
  • Low levels of physical activity - defined as being in precontemplation, contemplation, or preparation stages of change for physical activity with activity levels at, or below, 30 minutes per day/three days per week outside of school physical education class
  • Priority will be given to girls with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to the 75th percentile for age and gender

Exclusion Criteria:

  • BMI less than the 25th percentile for age and gender
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00250497


Locations
United States, Minnesota
University of Minnesota Division of Epidemiology and Community Health
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States, 55454
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, MN
  More Information

Publications:
Neumark-Sztainer D, Flattum CF, Story M, Feldman S, Petrich CA. Dietary approaches to healthy weight management for adolescents: the New Moves model. Adolesc Med State Art Rev. 2008 Dec;19(3):421-30, viii. Review.
Flattum C, Friend S, Neumark-Sztainer D, Story M. Motivational interviewing as a component of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent girls. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Jan;109(1):91-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2008.10.003.
Neumark-Sztainer D, Bauer KW, Friend S, Hannan PJ, Story M, Berge JM. Family weight talk and dieting: how much do they matter for body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviors in adolescent girls? J Adolesc Health. 2010 Sep;47(3):270-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.02.001. Epub 2010 Apr 21.
Neumark-Sztainer DR, Friend SE, Flattum CF, Hannan PJ, Story MT, Bauer KW, Feldman SB, Petrich CA. New moves-preventing weight-related problems in adolescent girls a group-randomized study. Am J Prev Med. 2010 Nov;39(5):421-32. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.07.017.
Bauer KW, Neumark-Sztainer D, Fulkerson JA, Hannan PJ, Story M. Familial correlates of adolescent girls' physical activity, television use, dietary intake, weight, and body composition. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011 Mar 31;8:25. doi: 10.1186/1479-5868-8-25.
Bauer KW, Neumark-Sztainer D, Fulkerson JA, Story M. Adolescent girls' weight-related family environments, Minnesota. Prev Chronic Dis. 2011 May;8(3):A68. Epub 2011 Apr 15.
Bauer KW, Neumark-Sztainer D, Hannan PJ, Fulkerson JA, Story M. Relationships between the family environment and school-based obesity prevention efforts: can school programs help adolescents who are most in need? Health Educ Res. 2011 Aug;26(4):675-88. doi: 10.1093/her/cyr027. Epub 2011 May 2.
Flattum C, Friend S, Story M, Neumark-Sztainer D. Evaluation of an individualized counseling approach as part of a multicomponent school-based program to prevent weight-related problems among adolescent girls. J Am Diet Assoc. 2011 Aug;111(8):1218-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.05.008.
Meyer KA, Demerath EW, Friend S, Hannan PJ, Neumark-Sztainer D. Body fat is differentially related to body mass index in U.S.-born African-American and East African immigrant girls. Am J Hum Biol. 2011 Sep-Oct;23(5):720-3. doi: 10.1002/ajhb.21201. Epub 2011 Jul 25.
Meyer KA, Friend S, Hannan PJ, Himes JH, Demerath EW, Neumark-Sztainer D. Ethnic variation in body composition assessment in a sample of adolescent girls. Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Oct;6(5-6):481-90. doi: 10.3109/17477166.2011.596841. Epub 2011 Jul 12.
Bauer KW, Friend S, Graham DJ, Neumark-Sztainer D. Beyond Screen Time: Assessing Recreational Sedentary Behavior among Adolescent Girls. J Obes. 2012;2012:183194. doi: 10.1155/2012/183194. Epub 2011 Oct 12.
Friend S, Bauer KW, Madden TC, Neumark-Sztainer D. Self-weighing among adolescents: associations with body mass index, body satisfaction, weight control behaviors, and binge eating. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Jan;112(1):99-103. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2011.08.036. Epub 2011 Nov 4.
Friend S, Flattum CF, Simpson D, Nederhoff DM, Neumark-Sztainer D. The researchers have left the building: what contributes to sustaining school-based interventions following the conclusion of formal research support? J Sch Health. 2014 May;84(5):326-33. doi: 10.1111/josh.12149.
Graham DJ, Bauer KW, Friend S, Barr-Anderson DJ, Nuemark-Sztainer D. Personal, behavioral, and socio-environmental correlates of physical activity among adolescent girls: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations. J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):51-61. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2011-0239. Epub 2012 Dec 17.

Responsible Party: University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00250497     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DK63107 (completed)
R01DK063107 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Submitted: November 7, 2005
First Posted: November 8, 2005
Results First Submitted: July 12, 2012
Results First Posted: August 3, 2015
Last Update Posted: March 22, 2017
Last Verified: February 2017

Keywords provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:
Adolescent
Girls
Physical Activity
Exercise
Diet
Body image

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms


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