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Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass vs LAP-BAND for Treatment of Morbid Obesity

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00247377
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 1, 2005
Results First Posted : April 6, 2010
Last Update Posted : May 18, 2010
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of California, Irvine

Brief Summary:

PURPOSE Obesity is a growing problem in the United States. Severe obesity, known as "morbid obesity", is defined as being 100 pounds in excess of ideal body weight. Nonsurgical treatments for morbid obesity include exercise, dietary restriction, behavior modification, and pharmacological intervention. However, it is estimated that most patients undergoing nonsurgical treatments for weight reduction will regain their weight within 2 to 4 years after treatment. According to the NIH consensus conference in 1991, surgery remains the only effective sustained weight loss treatment for morbid obesity. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is currently considered the gold standard bariatric surgical operation. Mean weight loss following GBP is approximately 65% of the excess body weight during the first 12 to 18 months postoperatively. Long-term weight loss is in the range of 55-70% of excess body weight loss.

Recently, the laparoscopic approach to GBP was reported. Wittgrove and colleagues reported their results of 75 patients who underwent laparoscopic GBP and demonstrated significant short-term advantages with comparable weight loss and reversal of comorbidities compared to the open approach. However, GBP might it be done laparoscopic or open approach can potentially be associated with significant morbidity and mortality such as anastomotic leak, pulmonary embolism, bowel obstruction, and postoperative stricture.

The FDA recently approved the laparoscopic adjustable banding system (LAP-BAND) for use in the United States in June 2001. The LAP-BAND system is a device designed to induce weight loss in severely obese patients. It is surgically placed around the proximal stomach to create a small proximal stomach pouch and restricted opening, or stoma, through which passage of food will be slowed. An inflatable portion along the inner aspect of the band is connected to an access port, placed intramuscularly. This enabled stoma adjustments to be made without the need for further surgery. The advantages of the LAP-BAND system included no cutting or opening of the stomach wall, ability to adjust the stoma and a technically easier operation to perform than laparoscopic GBP. We wanted to evaluate if the LAP-BAND procedure is as effective as the laparoscopic GBP procedure for treatment of morbid obesity.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Morbid Obesity Procedure: Gastric bypass surgery Procedure: Lap-Band Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

RATIONALE:

  1. Morbid obesity and its health consequences is increasing in the United States
  2. Roux-en-Y GBP is an effective treatment for morbid obesity but can be associated with substantial morbidities
  3. LAP-BAND system can be an effective treatment for morbidly obese patients with potentially reduced morbidity compared to laparoscopic GBP

HYPOTHESIS:

  1. LAP-BAND can be performed safely and are associated with reduced postoperative pain, decrease in morbidity, decrease ICU and hospital stay, reduced costs, comparable improvement in quality-of-life, and acceptable long-term weight loss compared with laparoscopic GBP
  2. LAP-BAND is associated with a decrease in fluid requirement in the perioperative period, improved postoperative pulmonary function, and lower intraabdominal pressure compared to laparoscopic GBP
  3. LAP-BAND does not alter esophageal motility and is effective in improvement of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms.

OBJECTIVES AND SPECIFIC AIMS:

  1. To determine the short-term outcome, quality-of-life, costs, and long-term weight loss after laparoscopic GBP compared with LAP-BAND.
  2. To compare physiologic changes such as perioperative fluid requirement, postoperative pulmonary function, and intraabdominal pressure after laparoscopic GBP and LAP-BAND.
  3. To evaluate the effect of LAP-BAND on esophageal motility and its effectiveness in controlling gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERD) for morbidly obese patients with GERD.

Please note: All physician, hospital, laboratory costs, the barium study tests, and the performance of the operation will be billed to the subject or their insurer as customary since these procedures are standard of care regardless of participation in the study. The research procedures such as the pulmonary function tests, intra-abdominal pressure, body fat composition tests, resting energy expenditure, exercise testing, strength testing, nutritional assessments, and esophageal function tests are considered research-related and will be paid for by the investigator.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 197 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Prospective Randomized Trial of Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass vs Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAP-BAND) for Treatment of Morbid Obesity
Study Start Date : October 2002
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2009
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2009

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass
Subject undergoes Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass
Procedure: Gastric bypass surgery
in order to meet health requirements for patient, gastric bypass surgery was undergone
Other Names:
  • gastric bypass
  • bypass surgery
  • weight loss surgery

Active Comparator: LAP-BAND
Subject undergoes LAP-BAND procedure
Procedure: Lap-Band
in order to meet health requirements for patient, gastric band surgery was undergone
Other Names:
  • weight loss surgery
  • band




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Excess Weight Loss From Pre-operation to 5 Years Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 5 years ]
    weight loss as measured by change in percent of excess body weight


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in Quality of Life- Physical Functioning Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response where 0 is non-functioning and 100 is fully functioning

  2. Cost of Procedure to the Medical Facility on Date of Procedure [ Time Frame: date of surgery ]
    operative and post-operative direct costs including hospital service costs per patient. costs reflect the average cost per patient in each of the two groups (band vs. bypass) at a single time point: date of surgery.

  3. Changes in Quality of Life- Role- Physical Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for physical aspects of life using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no Role-Physical and 100 corresponds to full Role-Physical

  4. Changes in Quality of Life- Bodily Pain Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for bodily pain using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no bodily pain and 100 corresponds to complete bodily pain

  5. Changes in Quality of Life: General Health Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for general health using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no general health satisfaction and 100 corresponds to complete health satisfaction

  6. Changes in Quality of Life- Vitality Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for vitality as measured using the SF-36 questionnaire with worst score being 0 and best score being 100 on a 1-100 point scale.

  7. Changes in Quality of Life- Social Functioning Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for social functioning as measured using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no social functioning and 100 corresponds to full social functioning

  8. Changes in Quality of Life- Role- Emotional Using SF-36 Questionnaire Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for the emotional role using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no emotional role and 100 corresponds to full emotional role

  9. Changes in Quality of Life- Mental Health Using SF-36 Questionnaire From Pre-operation to 12 Months Post-operation [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12 months ]
    change in quality of life survey response for mental health using the SF-36 questionnaire where 0 corresponds to no mental health well-being and 100 corresponds to complete mental health well-being



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 60 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Eligibility:

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Male or female patients with BMI of 40-60 kg/m2 or 35 kg/m2 with comorbidities
  2. Good health status with acceptable operative risk (good cardiopulmonary function)
  3. Willingness to follow protocol requirements: Signing informed consent, follow-up, and completing protocol diagnostic tests

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Prior upper abdominal surgery except cholecystectomy
  2. Large abdominal ventral hernia
  3. Patients with hiatal hernia
  4. Inadequate prior medical management
  5. Lack of patient's motivation and contribution to long-term success
  6. Unacceptable operative risk
  7. Minors and pregnant women are excluded as these patients do not qualify for the bariatric procedures. Minors are not psychologically fit to undergo such surgery and pregnant women are excluded because of safety for the fetus.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00247377


Locations
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United States, California
Univeristy of California, Irvine, Medical Center
Orange, California, United States, 92868
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, Irvine
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Ninh T Nguyen, MD University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA

Additional Information:
Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: Ninh T. Nguyen, MD, Chief, Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery University of California, Irvine Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00247377     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HS-2002-2394
First Posted: November 1, 2005    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: April 6, 2010
Last Update Posted: May 18, 2010
Last Verified: May 2010
Keywords provided by University of California, Irvine:
Morbid Obesity
Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass
Laparoscopic Gastric Banding
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Obesity
Obesity, Morbid
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms