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The Association Between the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Medication Adherence in Hypertensive African-Americans

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00227201
First Posted: September 27, 2005
Last Update Posted: April 25, 2008
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Information provided by:
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
  Purpose
The objective of this study is to better understand strategies used by African Americans with hypertension in order to control their blood pressure.

Condition Intervention
Hypertension Behavioral: Self-affirmation intervention

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: The Association Between the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Medication Adherence in Hypertensive African-Americans

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Weill Medical College of Cornell University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The impact of positive affect induction and self-affirmation on medication adherence and blood pressure control.

Estimated Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: June 2003
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2005
Detailed Description:
The objective of this study is to better understand strategies used by African Americans with hypertension in order to control their blood pressure. Through the use of qualitative interviews, the beliefs and attitudes toward complementary medicine of African Americans with hypertension will be elucidated.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Patients will be African-American adults 18 years or older who were diagnosed with poorly controlled hypertension as defined by the 6th Joint National Committee guidelines (systolic >140 and diastolic >90).
  2. Patients will also be eligible if they are taking any prescribed anti-hypertensive medications.
  3. Patients must be able to provide informed consent in English. Participants will be recruited from Cornell Internal Medicine Associates, the primary care and general medicine practice at Cornell Medical Center, the same site as the parent grant.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Patients who refused to participate.
  2. Patients who are unable to provide informed consent.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00227201


Locations
United States, New York
New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Medical College
New York, New York, United States, 10021
Sponsors and Collaborators
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jason Moore Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Principal Investigator: Mary E Charlson, MD Weill Medical College of Cornell University
  More Information

Publications:
JA Moore, Factors that influenced medication adherence among African-Americans with hypertension, to be presented at the 12th Annual NHLBI Cardiovascular Minority Research Supplement Awardee Session, American Heart Association, November 2004.

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00227201     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0301005948
First Submitted: September 23, 2005
First Posted: September 27, 2005
Last Update Posted: April 25, 2008
Last Verified: April 2008

Keywords provided by Weill Medical College of Cornell University:
African-American
Hypertension
Complementary medicine
Medication adherence

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hypertension
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases


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