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Exploring Folk Health Practices in Latinos With Chronic Medical Conditions

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00224237
First Posted: September 22, 2005
Last Update Posted: February 23, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Mary E. Charlson, MD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University
  Purpose
This study will explore how culture influences the use of folk healing practices and medical services in Latinos with chronic medical conditions.

Condition
Diabetes Hypertension Asthma Heart Disease Stroke Arthritis

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Exploring Folk Health Practices in Latinos With Chronic Medical Conditions

Further study details as provided by Mary E. Charlson, MD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University:

Enrollment: 54
Actual Study Start Date: December 2005
Study Completion Date: February 2008
Primary Completion Date: February 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
A
Participants will be self-identified, adult Latino men and women from the community setting. The sample will comprise of a convenience sample from community-based organizations, including persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, South American, or other Spanish-speaking culture.

Detailed Description:
Sociocultural aspects of using ethnomedical health practices in a community-based Latino population will be described using both qualitative and quantitative survey methods. This study will rely heavily on its descriptive section, which will use in-depth, open-ended questions in a semi-structured personal interview format following qualitative research principles. It will also use closed-ended questions in a short survey format to begin to explore some variables that may be associated with using traditional healing practices. These variables include level of acculturation, degree of family social support, degree of adherence to standard medical regimens, perceived health status, presence of depressive symptoms, and severity of co-illnesses. These variables will be examined using common, validated scales.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 100 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Participants will be self-identified, adult Latino men and women from the community setting. The sample will comprise of a convenience sample from community-based organizations, including persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, South American, or other Spanish-speaking culture.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Participants will be self-identified, adult men and women from the community setting. The sample comprise a convenience sample, including persons of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, South American, or other Spanish speaking culture.

  1. Latino men and women over the age of 18
  2. Those self-identifying as having at least one chronic medical condition including:diabetes, hypertension, asthma, history of heart disease or stroke or musculoskeletal disease (arthritis).
  3. Those reporting use of complementary or alternative therapies, including ethnomedical healing practices or practitioners.
  4. Those who speak English or Spanish.

Exclusion Criteria:

Individuals who refuse to participate.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00224237


Locations
United States, New York
The New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Medical Center
New York, New York, United States, 10021
Sponsors and Collaborators
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jacqueline Duarte, MD Weill Medical College of Cornell University
  More Information

Responsible Party: Mary E. Charlson, MD, Principal Investigator, Weill Medical College of Cornell University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00224237     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0505007876
First Submitted: September 20, 2005
First Posted: September 22, 2005
Last Update Posted: February 23, 2017
Last Verified: February 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: No Plan to Share IPD

Keywords provided by Mary E. Charlson, MD, Weill Medical College of Cornell University:
Latino patients
Health practices
Culture influences

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Heart Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases