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Medications for Stopping Cocaine Dependence and Preventing Relapse

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Joy Schmitz, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00218023
First received: September 16, 2005
Last updated: February 23, 2017
Last verified: February 2017
  Purpose
Cocaine dependence is a major public health problem; an effective primary treatment for cocaine dependent individuals has yet to be found. The purpose of this study is to identify subpopulations and baseline conditions that are most responsive to treatment for cocaine dependent individuals.

Condition Intervention Phase
Cocaine Abuse
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Drug: Modafinil
Drug: Levodopa/Carbidopa
Drug: Naltrexone HCl
Drug: Placebo
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing (MI)
Behavioral: Contingency management (CM)
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Screening Medications for Cocaine Cessation and Relapse Prevention

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Mean Proportion of Cocaine-positive Urines Over Course of 12 Week Treatment in Subgroup Achieving Abstinence at Baseline [ Time Frame: 3 times per week (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) for 12 weeks ]
    Cocaine use was determined by assessing for the presence of benzoylecgonine in urine.

  • Mean Proportion of Cocaine-positive Urines Over Course of 12 Week Treatment in Subgroup NOT Achieving Abstinence at Baseline [ Time Frame: 3 times per week (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) for 12 weeks ]
    Cocaine use was determined by assessing for the presence of benzoylecgonine in urine.


Enrollment: 120
Study Start Date: March 2006
Study Completion Date: April 2012
Primary Completion Date: April 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Modafinil plus MI, CM, and CBT

The modafinil dose began at 200 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 200 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase II.

The motivational interviewing (MI) intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I.

Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during Phase I) and medication compliance (during Phase II).

Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II.

Drug: Modafinil
The modafinil dose began at 200 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 200 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase I.
Other Name: Provigil
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing (MI)
The primary goal of motivational interviewing (MI) was to assist patients in achieving initial abstinence by increasing motivation and commitment to change. The MI intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I. The client-centered, MI-style sessions focused on building motivation for change, exploring ambivalence, obtaining a commitment to change, making a plan for abstinence (Session 1), providing personalized feedback, reassessing commitment for change, and reevaluating the change plan (Session 2). Masters-level therapists were trained and supervised by the therapy supervisor (ALS), an expert in motivation-based therapies.
Behavioral: Contingency management (CM)
Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during phase I) and medication compliance (during phase II).
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II. This therapy component focused on coping-skills training for resisting cocaine use in high-risk situations, based on relapse-prevention theory and manual-guided techniques. Therapy sessions were conducted by master's-level licensed professional counselors supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist, who monitored manual adherence and competency.
Experimental: Levodopa/Carbidopa plus MI, CM, and CBT

Levodopa-carbidopa, in the sustained-release formulation (Sinemet CR), began at a dose of levodopa/carbidopa 400/100 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 400/100 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase II.

The motivational interviewing (MI) intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I.

Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during Phase I) and medication compliance (during Phase II).

Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II.

Drug: Levodopa/Carbidopa
Levodopa-carbidopa, in the sustained-release formulation (Sinemet CR), began at a dose of levodopa/carbidopa 400/100 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 400/100 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase I.
Other Name: Simemet CR
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing (MI)
The primary goal of motivational interviewing (MI) was to assist patients in achieving initial abstinence by increasing motivation and commitment to change. The MI intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I. The client-centered, MI-style sessions focused on building motivation for change, exploring ambivalence, obtaining a commitment to change, making a plan for abstinence (Session 1), providing personalized feedback, reassessing commitment for change, and reevaluating the change plan (Session 2). Masters-level therapists were trained and supervised by the therapy supervisor (ALS), an expert in motivation-based therapies.
Behavioral: Contingency management (CM)
Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during phase I) and medication compliance (during phase II).
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II. This therapy component focused on coping-skills training for resisting cocaine use in high-risk situations, based on relapse-prevention theory and manual-guided techniques. Therapy sessions were conducted by master's-level licensed professional counselors supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist, who monitored manual adherence and competency.
Experimental: Naltrexone HCl plus MI, CM, and CBT

Naltrexone hydrochloride (HCl) doses began at 25 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 25 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase II.

The motivational interviewing (MI) intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I.

Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during Phase I) and medication compliance (during Phase II).

Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II.

Drug: Naltrexone HCl
Naltrexone hydrochloride (HCl) doses began at 25 mg (day 1) and increased to the fixed dose of 25 mg twice daily (day 2) during the 12 weeks of Phase I.
Other Name: Naltrexon hydrochloride
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing (MI)
The primary goal of motivational interviewing (MI) was to assist patients in achieving initial abstinence by increasing motivation and commitment to change. The MI intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I. The client-centered, MI-style sessions focused on building motivation for change, exploring ambivalence, obtaining a commitment to change, making a plan for abstinence (Session 1), providing personalized feedback, reassessing commitment for change, and reevaluating the change plan (Session 2). Masters-level therapists were trained and supervised by the therapy supervisor (ALS), an expert in motivation-based therapies.
Behavioral: Contingency management (CM)
Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during phase I) and medication compliance (during phase II).
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II. This therapy component focused on coping-skills training for resisting cocaine use in high-risk situations, based on relapse-prevention theory and manual-guided techniques. Therapy sessions were conducted by master's-level licensed professional counselors supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist, who monitored manual adherence and competency.
Placebo Comparator: Placebo plus MI, CM, and CBT

Placebo capsules were identical in appearance to active drug capsules, and each contained 50 mg riboflavin for subsequent evaluation of medication compliance.

The motivational interviewing (MI) intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I.

Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during Phase I) and medication compliance (during Phase II).

Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II.

Drug: Placebo
Placebo capsules were identical in appearance to active drug capsules, and each contained 50 mg riboflavin for subsequent evaluation of medication compliance.
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing (MI)
The primary goal of motivational interviewing (MI) was to assist patients in achieving initial abstinence by increasing motivation and commitment to change. The MI intervention consisted of two 1-h individual therapy sessions on the first and eighth day of Phase I. The client-centered, MI-style sessions focused on building motivation for change, exploring ambivalence, obtaining a commitment to change, making a plan for abstinence (Session 1), providing personalized feedback, reassessing commitment for change, and reevaluating the change plan (Session 2). Masters-level therapists were trained and supervised by the therapy supervisor (ALS), an expert in motivation-based therapies.
Behavioral: Contingency management (CM)
Contingency management (CM) is a voucher-based intervention. Subjects earned vouchers for cocaine abstinence (during phase I) and medication compliance (during phase II).
Behavioral: Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Subjects received weekly, 1-h, individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) sessions during Phase II. This therapy component focused on coping-skills training for resisting cocaine use in high-risk situations, based on relapse-prevention theory and manual-guided techniques. Therapy sessions were conducted by master's-level licensed professional counselors supervised by a licensed clinical psychologist, who monitored manual adherence and competency.

Detailed Description:

Cocaine is a strong central nervous system stimulant that is widely abused throughout the United Sates. Due to its widespread use, it is important to develop an effective treatment for cocaine dependence. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is often effective when combined with drug treatment. Baseline condition (e.g., abstinence status) and population type (e.g., ethnicity and gender) often affect how an individual responds to treatment for drug dependence. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence of baseline status and population type on treatment response in cocaine dependent individuals. In addition, this study will examine how various cocaine abuse medications target different neuronal systems, withdrawal symptoms, and relapse to drug use.

This study will take place in two phases. Phase I will last 4 weeks; participants will receive MI and undergo contingency-based urine tests in order to achieve the desired baseline condition. Phase II will last 12 weeks. Participants in Phase II will be randomly assigned to receive one of four treatments: 1) 50 mg naltrexone, 2) 800/200 mg levodopa/carbidopa, 3) 400 mg modafinil, or 4) placebo. During Phase II, all participants will receive psychotherapy and contingency management. Participants will complete urine drug screening tests 3 times each week. Follow-up study visits will occur between 3 and 6 months following Week 12, and will include objective and self-reported drug use.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 55 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Meets DSM-IV criteria for current cocaine dependence

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Meet diagnostic criteria for other serious psychiatric symptoms and/or disorders that would interfere with participation in the treatment study (e.g., psychosis; mania; suicidal/ homicidal ideation) including other forms of drug dependence, nicotine and cannabis excepted.
  • Medical conditions contraindicating naltrexone therapy (e.g., past history of opioid use in the 30 days prior to study entry or significant hepatocellular injury)
  • Medical conditions contraindicating modafinil therapy (e.g., hypertension, seizures, arrhythmia, or coronary artery disease)
  • Medical conditions contraindicating levodopa/carbidopa therapy (e.g., severe pulmonary/cardiovascular disease, narrow angle glaucoma, melanoma, history of peptic ulcer, or renal function impairment)
  • Requires certain medications
  • Current or recent treatment for substance use or other psychiatric condition
  • On parole or probation that requires reports of drug use to officers of the court
  • Pending incarceration
  • Pregnant or breastfeeding
  • Unable to read, write, or speak English
  • Plans to leave the study area within 3 months of study entry
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00218023

Locations
United States, Texas
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Houston, Texas, United States, 77030
Sponsors and Collaborators
The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Joy M Schmitz, PhD University of Texas
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Responsible Party: Joy Schmitz, Professor - Psy, Behavioral Science, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00218023     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NIDA-09262-7
P50DA009262-07 ( US NIH Grant/Contract Award Number )
DPMC ( Other Identifier: NIDA )
Study First Received: September 16, 2005
Results First Received: February 23, 2017
Last Updated: February 23, 2017

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Product Manufactured in and Exported from the U.S.: No

Keywords provided by The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston:
cocaine
cocaine addiction
cocaine abuse
relapse prevention

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Recurrence
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders
Cocaine
Levodopa
Carbidopa
Naltrexone
Modafinil
Armodafinil
Anesthetics, Local
Anesthetics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors
Neurotransmitter Uptake Inhibitors
Membrane Transport Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Dopamine Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Narcotic Antagonists
Wakefulness-Promoting Agents
Central Nervous System Stimulants
Cytochrome P-450 CYP3A Inducers

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on May 25, 2017