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A Study to Evaluate Safety, Immunogenicity and Proof-of-concept of RTS,S/AS02A, and RTS,S/AS01B, Two Candidate Malaria Vaccines in Malaria-experienced Adults Living in Western Kenya.

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00197054
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 20, 2005
Last Update Posted : February 4, 2013
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
GlaxoSmithKline
Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

Brief Summary:
The candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S/AS02A developed by GSK Biologicals demonstrated 30% efficacy against clinical episodes of malaria and approximately 58% efficacy against severe malaria disease. As a potential improvement to RTS,S/AS02A, another candidate vaccine RTS,S/AS01B is being developed in parallel in collaboration with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR). This study will be the first administration of the RTS,S/AS01B vaccine to the African adults to establish safety and immunogenicity in this population. Preliminary indication of vaccine efficacy with this adjuvant will be established by monitoring the time to the first infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Plasmodium Falciparum Biological: RTS,S/AS02A and RTS,S/AS01B Phase 2

Detailed Description:
The study comprises of 3 groups and the participating subjects will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups. The first group will receive RTS,S/AS01B, the second group will receive RTS,S/AS02A and the third group will receive rabies vaccine. Immunization will be given by IM injection on 0, 1, 2 month schedule. Infants will be followed up daily for 7 days for solicited symptoms and 30 days for unsolicited symptoms after each vaccine dose. Serious adverse events will be recorded throughout the study period. A week prior to Dose 3, subjects will be treated with a licenced anti-malarial drug. Starting from two weeks after Dose 3, the subjects will be monitored for a 14-week duration for detection of malaria infection.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 255 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: A Phase IIb Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study of the Safety, Immunogenicity and Proof-of-concept of RTS,S/AS02A, and RTS,S/AS01B, Two Candidate Malaria Vaccines in Malaria-experienced Adults Living in Western Kenya.
Study Start Date : July 2005
Primary Completion Date : September 2006
Study Completion Date : September 2006

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Malaria
U.S. FDA Resources




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Safety of the vaccine up to 7 days post Dose 3.

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Safety of the vaccine upto 4 months post Dose 3. Antibody levels for relevant immunological indicators up to 4 months post Dose 3. Efficacy of the vaccine against malaria infection up to 4 months post Dose 3.


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  • Healthy male or female volunteers aged between 18 and 35 years at the time of first vaccination who have given written consent for their participation in the study were included
  • If the volunteer is female, she must be of non-childbearing potential, i.e. either surgically sterilized or one year post-menopausal; or, if of childbearing potential, she must be abstinent or have used adequate contraceptive precautions for 30 days prior to vaccination, have a negative pregnancy test and must agree to continue such precautions for two months after completion of the vaccination series

Exclusion criteria:

  • If a subject plans to take vaccine not foreseen by the study protocol within 30 days of the first dose of vaccine(s) with the exception of tetanus toxoid will be excluded
  • Volunteers with any confirmed or suspected immunosuppressive or immunodeficient conditions
  • Family history of congenital or hereditary immunodeficiency
  • History of allergic reactions to previous immunizations
  • HBsAg positive subjects
  • History of splenectomy
  • Pregnant or lactating females will be excluded from the study

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00197054


Locations
Kenya
U.S. Army Research Unit-Kenya
Kisumu, Kenya
Sponsors and Collaborators
U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
GlaxoSmithKline
Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR)
Investigators
Study Director: GSK Clinical Trials GlaxoSmithKline

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00197054     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: A-13399
104743
First Posted: September 20, 2005    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 4, 2013
Last Verified: February 2013

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Malaria
Protozoan Infections
Parasitic Diseases