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Parenting Matters: Helping Parents With Young Children

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00133055
First Posted: August 22, 2005
Last Update Posted: August 16, 2011
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
Information provided by:
University of Western Ontario, Canada
  Purpose
Sleep and discipline problems are the most common problems for parents of young children (ages 2 to 5 years old) and are the two concerns with the strongest relations to future child behavior problems. The Parenting Matters program combines treatment booklets and telephone support to help parents deal with sleep or discipline problems. Parents with concerns and who are interested in the study are identified during a visit to their family physician. We, the investigators at the University of Western Ontario, expect that parents receiving treatment booklets, along with usual care by their family physician, will have greater reductions in their child's sleep or discipline problems, improved parenting practices, and greater reductions in child behaviour problems after receiving the Parenting Matters intervention, compared to parents receiving usual medical care.

Condition Intervention Phase
Sleep Problems Behavior Problems Child Behavior Behavioral: Self-help treatment booklet and telephone support Behavioral: Usual care by a family physician Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Parenting Matters: Helping Parents With Young Children

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Western Ontario, Canada:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Sleep and bedtime problems trial (Trial 1): parent report on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization ]
  • Discipline problems trial (Trial 2): parent rated total problem score on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization ]
  • Sleep and discipline problems trial (Trial 3): parent report on the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire (Group 1-sleep treatment) and parent rated total problem score on the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (Group 2-discipline treatment) [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Parenting practices-total score on the Parenting Scale [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization; 3- & 6-month follow-up; 12-month follow-up treatment group only ]
  • General child behavior problems-total problem score on the Child Behavior Checklist [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization; 3- & 6-month follow-up; 12-month follow-up treatment group only ]
  • Daily recall ratings of sleep and discipline problems (3 reports in total) [ Time Frame: 4 & 6 weeks post randomization; 3- & 6-month follow-up; 12-month follow-up treatment group only ]
  • Parent report on the Richman sleep questionnaires (only for Trial 1-sleep and bedtime problems and for Trial 3 participants if in sleep treatment condition) [ Time Frame: 7 weeks post randomization; 3- & 6-month follow-up; 12-month follow-up treatment group only ]

Enrollment: 548
Study Start Date: July 2005
Study Completion Date: March 2009
Primary Completion Date: March 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Treatment booklet and telephone coaching Behavioral: Self-help treatment booklet and telephone support
The Parenting Matters treatment program consisted of a self-help treatment booklet and two telephone coaching calls from a paraprofessional telephone coach at Weeks 2 and 5 of the program. Two booklets were used in the three trials; one addressed sleep issues and the second discipline problems.
Usual Care Behavioral: Usual care by a family physician
Parents in the usual care condition were told to continue with care from their family physician and/or any other treatment recommended by the physician.

Detailed Description:

About 1 in 5 young children (ages 2 to 5 years) has a significant psychosocial problem, but over 80% do not receive treatment. Without treatment, up to half of these children will have problems into childhood and adolescence. New methods of treating and preventing children's psychosocial problems are needed.

Sleep and discipline problems (or child non-compliance) are the most common problems for parents of young children, and are the two concerns with the strongest relations to future child behavior problems. Further, parenting practices have consistently been linked to the development of psychosocial problems. The Parenting Matters program combines treatment booklets and telephone support to help parents with sleep or discipline problems among young children.

Objectives:

  • Test the efficacy of the Parenting Matters program interventions for sleeping and bedtime behaviors (Trial 1), and discipline (Trial 2) in reducing problem-specific outcomes.
  • Test the effects of the Parenting Matters program interventions for parents who are concerned about both their children's sleep and discipline (Trial 3) in reducing problem-specific outcomes related to sleep (Group 1) and discipline problems (Group 2) will be tested.
  • Test the efficacy of the Parenting Matters program in improving parenting practices.
  • Test the efficacy of the Parenting Matters program in reducing child behaviour problems in general.
  • Examine predictors of treatment success.

Method:

All parents of 2 to 5 year-olds seen in a family practice for a routine appointment are asked to complete a psychosocial concerns checklist. Parents who have concerns regarding their child's sleep (Trial 1), how to discipline their child (Trial 2), or concerns about both their child's sleep and discipline (Trial 3), and meet the other study criteria, are invited to take part in the study. Mailed baseline assessment packages assess children's behavior, parenting practices and potential predictors of treatment success.

Parents are randomized to usual care, or the Parenting Matters program along with usual care. The Parenting Matters program includes treatment booklets addressing either sleep or discipline problems, and telephone coach support (3 calls over 6 weeks).

Primary outcomes are parents' ratings of their children's sleep or discipline problems measured at post-treatment (7 weeks after baseline). Parents repeat assessment packages at 3- and 6-month follow-ups.

Goals & Relevance:

This research addresses the need for new ways of providing early interventions for young children that:

  • reach the largest number of individuals in need;
  • are cost effective; and
  • time efficient.

By addressing the most common issues facing parents of young children, it engages parents in areas of direct relevance to them. The program focuses on parenting practices thereby building family strengths that may have a lasting impact on child development. Collaboration with family physicians builds on the ongoing positive relationships between parents and family physicians and provides a mechanism to reach a significant proportion of young children.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parent (primary caregiver) of a 2-5 year old child
  • Attending a medical appointment at a family medical practice
  • Phone in home
  • Parent concerned about child's sleep and/or discipline
  • Parent interested in participating in a treatment study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Parent non-English speaking
  • Child with significant physical or developmental disability
  • Parent's only sleep concern is in regards to a physiological sleep disorder (e.g. sleep apnea, snoring) or bedwetting
  • No phone
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00133055


Locations
Canada, Ontario
University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada, N6C 5A2
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Western Ontario, Canada
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Graham J Reid, PhD University of Western Ontario, Canada
  More Information

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Graham J. Reid, Associate Professor, The University of Western Ontario
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00133055     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 67816; 280205-014
ISRCTN81511074
First Submitted: August 18, 2005
First Posted: August 22, 2005
Last Update Posted: August 16, 2011
Last Verified: August 2011

Keywords provided by University of Western Ontario, Canada:
parenting
sleep problems
behavior problems
brief intervention
self-help
preschool-age children
psychosocial

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Problem Behavior
Dyssomnias
Sleep Wake Disorders
Parasomnias
Behavioral Symptoms
Nervous System Diseases
Mental Disorders
Neurologic Manifestations
Signs and Symptoms