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Methods of Determining Asthma Severity in Children

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00132834
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 22, 2005
Last Update Posted : January 25, 2013
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Brief Summary:

Current methods of measuring asthma severity can be problematic when used with children. A measurement called exhaled breath condensates (EBC) may be a more useful way to determine asthma severity in childhood. The purpose of this study is to determine if EBC measurements are useful for determining asthma severity in asthmatic children as compared to currently used laboratory measures.

Study hypotheses: 1) A broad panel of EBC measures will distinguish asthmatic children not on inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) from both asthmatic children routinely taking ICS and nonasthmatic controls. 2) Standardized equipment and methodologies for EBC collection, processing, storage, shipping, and pH and mediator measurements can be developed that will eliminate significant contamination from oropharyngeal saliva and allow for shipping and processing at a central site.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Asthma Device: R-Tube or EcoScreen

Detailed Description:

The current national guidelines for assessing asthma severity have several limitations for use in asthmatic children. One major limitation is that spirometric measures of airflow limitation, including forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), generally cannot be reliably obtained in children less than 7 years of age. Furthermore, most children with asthma have essentially normal measures of airflow by spirometry or peak flow, so such measurements are generally not useful in diagnosis and treatment. Previous studies indicate that lung-specific biomarkers of inflammation, such as bronchial hyperresponsiveness measures, might simplify, improve, and optimize the guidelines. Collection of EBC samples may also be useful; EBC samples can be obtained by noninvasive means and are easier to obtain than conventional samples. However, contamination by saliva is an issue in collecting EBC samples, and standardization of sample collection is needed. This study will compare the utility of two different sample collecting equipment, the EcoScreen and the R-Tube. This study will also evaluate the usefulness of EBC samples in distinguishing between asthmatic children taking ICS, asthmatic children not taking ICS, and nonasthmatic children.

There are 2 parts to this study. In Part A, two EBC samples will be collected from each participant. Some participants will be have one EBC sample taken by the EcoScreen and the other taken by the R-Tube; other participants will have both samples taken by the R-Tube. In Part B, asthmatics taking ICS, asthmatics not taking ICS, and nonasthmatics will give 2 EBC samples each via the R-Tube.

Participants will be asked to complete a questionnaire on their asthma symptoms and allergies and will have a brief physical exam. Allergy skin prick testing, urine collection, measurement of exhaled nitric oxide, and conventional incentive spirometry (used to obtain several measures of lung function) will also occur. Participants will also be asked to donate a blood sample.


Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 80 participants
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Exhaled Breath Condensates ("EBC") Study: Research Plan NIH/NIAID: Inner City Asthma Consortium (ICAC)
Study Start Date : November 2003
Actual Study Completion Date : March 2004

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Asthma

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Asthma/no ICS
Asthmatic children who are not currently taking ICS
Device: R-Tube or EcoScreen
Device for collection of exhaled breath condensates (EBC) collection (i.e. condensing and collecting breath vapor from a cold, solid surface)

Asthma/ICS
Asthmatic children on ICS
Device: R-Tube or EcoScreen
Device for collection of exhaled breath condensates (EBC) collection (i.e. condensing and collecting breath vapor from a cold, solid surface)

Non-asthmatic children
Children without asthma
Device: R-Tube or EcoScreen
Device for collection of exhaled breath condensates (EBC) collection (i.e. condensing and collecting breath vapor from a cold, solid surface)





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Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 17 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for All Participants:

  • Physician-diagnosed asthma
  • Symptoms consistent with persistent asthma in the year prior to study entry
  • Able to speak and understand English
  • Parent or guardian willing to provide informed consent

Exclusion Criteria for All Participants:

  • Diagnoses indicating other lung-related disorders (e.g., cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia [BPD])
  • Allergy to latex
  • Smoker
  • Albuterol use within 12 hours of study entry
  • Long-acting bronchodilator or leukotriene modifier use within 24 hours of study entry
  • Unable to use the R-Tube. More information on this criterion can be found in the DAIT ICAC-EBC protocol.

Exclusion Criteria for Part A Participants:

  • ICS or oral corticosteroid use in the month prior to study entry

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00132834


Sponsors and Collaborators
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Andrew H. Liu, MD National Jewish Health
Principal Investigator: Wayne Morgan, MD, CM University of Arizona Health Sciences Center

Publications:
Responsible Party: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00132834     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DAIT ICAC-05
First Posted: August 22, 2005    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 25, 2013
Last Verified: January 2013

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Asthma
Bronchial Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Hypersensitivity
Immune System Diseases