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Osteoarthritis: Weakness From Inflammation

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. Identifier: NCT00104312
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 25, 2005
Last Update Posted : May 29, 2009
Information provided by:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to understand the factors that lead to muscle weakness with arthritis and aging.

Condition or disease

Detailed Description:

Through this study, we hope to learn about the natural history of knee osteoarthritis and the disability that arises from it. We hope to better understand why people with knee osteoarthritis develop difficulty with mobility (e.g. walking, standing) in hopes of finding a cure.

This study requires 1 four-hour visit to Harbor Hospital. The visit involves a physical exam, a DEXA bone density scan, blood and urine testing, knee x-rays, strength testing and a surface electromyography (EMG). Samples of muscle, joint fluid and joint tissue will be collected during your planned surgery.

Participation in this study is entirely voluntary.

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 88 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Weakness From Inflammation: A Basis of Disability From Knee Osteoarthritis
Study Start Date : April 2001
Primary Completion Date : May 2009
Study Completion Date : May 2009

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Osteoarthritis
U.S. FDA Resources

Participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
Participants without symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, age-matched as controls

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Synovial fluid and tissue blood serum muscle biopsy

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.

Ages Eligible for Study:   50 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Community - Men and women

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 50 years of age or older
  • Normal body weight (a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or less)
  • Osteoarthritis of the knee (prior to knee surgery)
  • Planning to have knee surgery at a MedStar Hospital

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of a stroke
  • History of muscle weakness or paralysis
  • History of Rheumatoid Arthritis or
  • Inflammatory Joint Disease
  • History of a Bleeding Disorder
  • History of Gout
  • Diabetes for which you take insulin
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica (total body muscle aching/stiffness)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its identifier (NCT number): NCT00104312

United States, Maryland
Harbor Hospital
Baltimore, Maryland, United States, 21225
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Principal Investigator: Shari Ling, MD NIA, Johns Hopkins Medical Institution Divisions of Rheumatology, Gerontology, and Geriatrics

Responsible Party: Shari Ling, MD, Principal Investigator, National Institute on Aging Identifier: NCT00104312     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AG0016
First Posted: February 25, 2005    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 29, 2009
Last Verified: May 2009

Keywords provided by National Institute on Aging (NIA):
Knee Osteoarthritis

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Joint Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Rheumatic Diseases
Pathologic Processes