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Sleep Disordered Breathing, APOE, and Lipid Metabolism

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00046670
First Posted: October 1, 2002
Last Update Posted: March 5, 2014
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Information provided by:
Stanford University
  Purpose
To examine the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and lipid metabolism.

Condition
Sleep Apnea Syndromes Lung Diseases

Study Type: Observational

Further study details as provided by Stanford University:

Study Start Date: September 2002
Study Completion Date: April 2007
Primary Completion Date: April 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

Recent findings suggest interrelationships between obstructive sleep apnea, lipid metabolism, and neurodegeneration. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 (APOE e4), a genetic marker linked to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with a two fold increased risk of sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and an increase in severity of apnea symptoms. Preliminary data suggest that this association is stronger between the ages of 50 and 65. Other experiments suggest dysregulated leptin levels in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Taken together, these findings suggest common pathophysiological mechanisms involving dysregulated lipid metabolism in OSA. An understanding of these mechanisms is essential for the prevention and treatment of SDB.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

Using case/control and family designs, the study: 1) extends the finding that apolipoprotein E epsilon4 (APOE e4) increases the risk of sleep apnea in the general population; 2) examines if polymorphisms in other genes regulating lipid levels are associated with sleep apnea; 3) studies the relationship between lipid regulatory gene polymorphisms, lipid profile (LDL- cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides), plasma leptin (and other lipid regulatory hormones), and sleep apnea levels.

T

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
No eligibility criteria
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00046670


Sponsors and Collaborators
Stanford University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Investigators
OverallOfficial: Emmanuel Mignot Stanford University