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Effect of Ventilation-Feedback Training on Exercise Performance in COPD

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00037973
First Posted: May 27, 2002
Last Update Posted: September 16, 2010
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
VA Office of Research and Development
  Purpose
The primary objective of the study is to determine whether individuals with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) who complete ventilation-feedback training combined with a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength program will demonstrate significantly longer exercise duration on a constant work rate treadmill test when compared to subjects who are randomly assigned to a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program without ventilation-feedback or ventilation-feedback only. Secondary study objectives are to determine whether individuals with COPD who complete ventilation-feedback training combined with a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program will demonstrate significantly: (a) greater exercise tolerance and aerobic power; (b) lower perception of breathlessness during progressive and constant work rate leg-cycle and treadmill exercise testing; (c) higher tidal volume and lower breathing frequency during constant work rate and at any given workload during progressive testing; (d) lower score on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire indicating improved quality of life; (e) higher transition focal score (less dyspnea) on the Transition Dyspnea Index; (f) maintain a sustained breathing-pattern adjustment to exercise when compared to subjects who are randomly assigned to a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength program without ventilation-feedback or ventilation-feedback only.

Condition Intervention Phase
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive Behavioral: ventilation feedback Behavioral: exercise Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effects of Ventilation-Feedback Training on Exercise Performance in COPD

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by VA Office of Research and Development:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Exercise endurance [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]

Estimated Enrollment: 108
Study Start Date: August 2000
Study Completion Date: August 2003
Primary Completion Date: August 2003 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
Ventilation-feedback plus exercise
Behavioral: ventilation feedback Behavioral: exercise
Active Comparator: 2
Exercise
Behavioral: exercise
Active Comparator: 3
ventilation feedback only
Behavioral: ventilation feedback

Detailed Description:

Statement of the Problem: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term used to characterize those individuals with chronic bronchitis or emphysema who have obstruction to airflow on a spirogram. 1) Patients with COPD have a poor exercise capacity that is reflective of their underlying disease. 2) The symptoms of lung disease triggered by simple low-intensity activities of daily living such as dressing and undressing, bathing and shopping are insufferable, consequently these patients become sedentary. An increasingly sedentary lifestyle leads to muscle deconditioning making physical activity even more intolerable. 3) The cycle continues in a downward spiral. Pulmonary rehabilitation is essential to assist persons with COPD to cope with their disease. The two primary objectives of pulmonary rehabilitation are to control and alleviate the symptoms of the respiratory illness and to assist the patient toward optimal capabilities in carrying out his/her activities of daily living. 4) The proposed study will evaluate the efficacy of a unique program of ventilation-feedback training combined with leg-cycle and walking exercise to improve exertional endurance, perceived dyspnea and quality of life in persons with COPD.

Hypothesis: Individuals with COPD who complete 12-weeks of ventilation-feedback training combined with a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program will demonstrate significantly longer exercise duration on the treadmill constant work rate (CWR) exercise test when compared to subjects who are randomly assigned to a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training or a ventilation-feedback training only program.

Specific Objectives:

Short-term Objectives- The primary objective of the proposed study is to determine whether individuals with COPD who complete 12-weeks of ventilation-feedback training combined with a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program will demonstrate significantly longer exercise duration on the treadmill CWR exercise test when compared to subjects who are randomly assigned to a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program without ventilation-feedback or a ventilation-feedback program only. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to determine whether individuals with COPD who complete ventilation-feedback training combined with a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training or ventilation-feedback only program will, when compared to subjects who are randomly assigned to a moderately-high intensity exercise and upper body strength training program only, demonstrate significantly: (a) greater work tolerance and aerobic power on maximal leg-cycle and treadmill exercise tests; (b) lower perception of breathlessness during progressive and CWR leg-cycle and treadmill exercise tests; (c) significantly higher tidal volume (VT) and lower breathing frequency during CWR and at any given workload on the progressive leg-cycle and treadmill exercise tests; (d) lower score on the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ)5 indicating better quality of life; and (e) higher transition focal score on the Transition Dyspnea Index (TDI).6 In addition, six weeks after completing the training program all subjects will repeat the treadmill CWR test. This will be done to assess whether the positive effects of the ventilation-feedback training persist beyond the 12-week training period.

Long-term Objectives: If our hypothesis is correct, we will use the ventilation-feedback technique to teach a more efficient breathing pattern during activities of daily living. In time, the system will be miniaturized and portable thereby making this new technique readily usable during pulmonary rehabilitation.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   40 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Exclusion Criteria:

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00037973


Locations
United States, Illinois
Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital
Hines, Illinois, United States, 60141-5000
Sponsors and Collaborators
VA Office of Research and Development
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Eileen G. Collins, PhD RN Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Collins, Eileen - Principal Investigator, Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00037973     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: F2302
First Submitted: May 24, 2002
First Posted: May 27, 2002
Last Update Posted: September 16, 2010
Last Verified: September 2010

Keywords provided by VA Office of Research and Development:
COPD
Ventilation

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Chronic Disease
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes
Lung Diseases, Obstructive